Skip to site navigation

News viewer

Workshop 3 Report Online

Publication date:


The report on the third cluster workshop Physical Encounters: increased benefit or increased risk? held on Tuesday 2 June 2009 , at UCL Institute of Archaeology, London, is now online http://www.ucl.ac.uk/conservation-c-22/workshop_3/report_3

Publication date:


Booking is now open for 'What's the Damage?', the
conference for the AHRC/EPSRC Science and Heritage Programme research
cluster: Cultural Encounters and Explorations: Conservation's 'Catch-22'.
The conference will take place on Wednesday 23 September 2009 at UCL
Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY.

'What's the Damage?' is the concluding activity of the research cluster
and will address questions arising from the three workshops
(http://www.ucl.ac.uk/conservation-c-22/programme) and online discussion
(https://www.ucl.ac.uk/conservation-c-22-blog/) held earlier this year.
These activities examined the tension between conservation and access in
order to develop a clearer understanding of the consequences of physical
access on the condition of objects. The conference aims to address how the
issue of physical encounters with objects should be taken forward. There
will be a combination of presentations and panel discussions and the day
will conclude with a glass of wine!

The conference fee is £20 with a reduced rate of £5 for students (50
student places are offered).

The booking form, programme, and abstracts are available on the research
cluster website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/conservation-c-22/conference.

The booking deadline is 15 September 2009.

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME (DRAFT)

The challenge of conservation’s ‘Catch 22’.  Elizabeth Pye, UCL Institute
of Archaeology.

It's all Greek to me! Reflections on some issues relating to classical
marbles.
Susan Pearce, University of Leicester.

Creating the right atmosphere: for people and for collections.  Ben
Cowell, The National Trust.

A right versus a right. Balancing two sections of the museum code of
ethics: a question of trust?
Julia Shelley and Stuart Kennedy, Reading Museum.

Feeling our way: towards a shared approach to object handling in the
Public Galleries.
Paul Sullivan, Bristol Museums.

A close-up look: ‘Meet the Antiquities’ in the Fitzwilliam Museum
Julie Dawson and Helen Strudwick, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

Panel: How powerful are the benefits of access?
Chiara Ambrosio, UCL Science and Technology Studies (Chair).

The conservation object: linking past condition to present lives
Dean Sully, UCL Institute of Archaeology.

Damage and how to manage it.
Amber Xavier-Rowe, English Heritage.

Measuring damage using state-of-the art analysis techniques. David McPhail
and Richard Chater, Imperial College.

Do we know what we are missing? Exploring the real value and potential of
virtual touch in museum display
Angela Geary, Northumbria University.

Panel Discussion: How serious are the risks of damage?
Helen Wilkinson, Museums Association. (Chair)

Handling the Future
Jonathan Ashley Smith, Royal College of Art.


Publication date:

CHArt TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

OBJECT AND IDENTITY IN A DIGITAL AGE

Thursday 12 - Friday 13 November 2009

Birkbeck, University of London, Clore Lecture Theatre, Clore Management Centre, Torrington Square, London, WC1 7HX.

THEME

This year's CHArt conference engages with the idea of object and identity in relation to art practice, production, consumption, representation and display. The conference will explore new notions of the identity of the artist, including those involving collaboration and anonymity; new conceptions and ontologies of the art object, as processual, virtual, or hybrid; new means of consumption and reception, whether in galleries and museums, in public spaces, or over networks of broadcast and narrowcast; and the challenges these transformations bring to the display of art and to its curation and access.

Places are limited so early booking is recommended.

The booking form is available online on www.chart.ac.uk<http://www.chart.ac.uk>.  Bookings made before 1 October 2009 will be entitled to a discount.  Conference fees (pounds sterling) - include coffee/tea breaks and lunch.


PROGRAMME



THURSDAY 6 NOVEMBER

KEYNOTE – Frieder Nake, University of Bremen, Germany.
Only Artist. Only Engineer. Only Critic. Transcending Disciplines in Early Digital Art.


SESSION 1

Patterns of Movement in Live Languages.
Alex McLean, Geraint Wiggins, Goldsmiths, University of London.

The Software in Art.
Ernest Edmonds, University of Technology Sydney.

Interfaces of Performance.
Maria Chatzichristodoulou (Maria X), University of Hull; Janis Jefferies, Goldsmiths, University of London; Rachel Zerihan, Queen Mary University of London.

The Screaming Head: Making the Most of the Random Attributes of Sensors in the Construction of a Virtual Performer.
Mary Oliver, University of Salford.


SESSION 2

Making Connections: Children, Objects, Meanings and Museums.
Helena Tomlin and Irit Narkiss, The Manchester Museum.

Art and Orphan Works:  Ownership and Discovery.
Annette Ward, Scottish Power; Annsley Merelle Ward, Gallant Macmillan LLP; James Stevenson, Victoria and Albert Museum; Stephen McKenna, Ian Ricketts, University of Dundee.


Emergent questions: Digitisation, Cultural Heritage and the Social Agency of Images.
Devorah Romanek, The British Museum.

Cut and Paste Art History: Image Manipulation as Spurious Art Historical Proof of the Face of Shakespeare.
Marcus Risdell, Garrick Club.


SESSION 3

Re-Materialisation of the Art Object.
Dew Harrison, University of Wolverhampton.

Puppeteers, Performers or Avatars: A Perceptual Difference in Telematic Space.
Paul Sermon, University of Salford.

The Work of Art in the Age of Virtual Production.
Andrew Sempere, IBM Watson Research.

The Creative Use of Online Social Networking Sites to Increase Public Engagement and Participation in the Professional Arts Through Collaborative Involvement in Creative Practice.
Sophy Smith, De Montfort University, Leicester.


(The CHArt Annual General Meeting will take place at the end of day 1)


FRIDAY 13 NOVEMBER


SESSION 4

The Role of Art in Computer Game Design.
Colin B. Price, June S. Moore, University of Worcester.

The Artist as Designer, the Artist as User: Developing a Collaborative Framework for Artistic Engagement in ICT Design.
Frederik Lesage, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Big Bird is Watching You! Art, Activism and Technology in the Public Arena.
Denitsa Petrova, Edinburgh College of Art.

Are You Clean? Parasitic Art and Privacy.
Jeremy Pilcher, Lancaster University.


SESSION 5

Software Maintenance.
Wayne Clements, Chelsea College of Art and Design.

Databasing the Arts:The Enactment of Art Objects in Networked Infrastructures.
Sarah de Rijcke, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

ArtLog: An Electronic Archive of Artistic Process
Yvonne Desmond, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland.

Try to Get that Kindle Signed: The Comic Book as Cultural Interface
Ernesto Priego, University College London.


SESSION 6

The Case of Liberation Aesthetics Versus Digital Identit(ies).
Timothy Allen Jackson, Savannah College of Art and Design, USA.

Performing Information.
Christoph Klütsch, Savannah College of Art and Design, USA.

Putting Lipstick on the Golem?
John Lifton, Lifton Zoline International LLC and Institut Slavonice.

Curation as High-Level Programming.
Gabriel Menotti, Goldsmiths, University of London.


BOOKING FEE

CHArt Member: TWO DAYS £120 (£100 before 1 Oct 2009)
CHArt Member: ONE DAY £80 (£70 before 1 Oct 2009)
Non-member: TWO DAYS £160 (£140 before 1 Oct 2009)
Non-member: ONE DAY £110 (£100 before 1 Oct 2009)
CHArt Student Member: TWO DAYS £65 £45 before 1 Oct 2009)
CHArt Student Member: ONE DAY £45(£35 before 1 Oct 2009)
Student Non-member: TWO DAYS £85 (£65 before 1 Oct 2009)
Student Non-member: ONE DAY £55 (£45 before 1 Oct 2009)



Publication date:


We are delighted to announce that booking is now open for 'What's the Damage?'

The booking form, draft programme, and draft abstracts are available on our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/conservation-c-22/conference

'What’s the Damage?'  will aim to address questions arising from the three recent research cluster workshops and blog discussion, with the aim of deciding how we should take the issue of physical encounters with objects forward. There will be a combination of  presentations and panel discussions and the day will conclude with a glass of wine!

Do book early to be assured of a place!  Please also keep in mind that the booking deadline is 15 September 2009.


Publication date:

 Posted on behalf of Adam Wainwright:

There are some places available at the second 'Touching the Untouchable' AHRC-EPSRC Science-Heritage Cluster workshop which will take place in Edinburgh on 22-23 September.

PROGRAMME

22 September:

Guided tour of the National Museum of Scotland (optional - times to be confirmed)

Registration and lunch (12-2pm)

Publication date:


On behalf of Mona Hess:

I would like to invite you to the upcoming methodological workshop in
September in the name of UCL Museums and Collections and UCL E-Curator.
For registration please contact Lauren Sadler, l.sadler@ucl.ac.uk.

Invitation to Methodological workshop: 'Life cycle of a digital object.
Hands-on experience from laser scanning to visualization and 3D printing.'
- 3/4 September 2009, UCL

Following UCL’s very successful conference on 3D Colour Laser Scanning in
March 2008 we are planning a 2-day workshop exploring the lifecyle of a
digital object. The workshop is funded by JISC through the Arts and
Humanities e-Science Support Centre (AHeSSC).

Who is invited?
The workshop is aimed at anyone interested in user engagement with 3D
objects. It will help researchers and professionals better understand how
to use 3D objects and related digital data records. It will be
particularly relevant for conservators, curators and educators wanting to
use 3D or 2D records of museum artefacts and for Arts and Humanities
researchers interested in this field.

What will be covered?
3 September. The first day will offer opportunities for small group guided
tours of relevant UCL facilities. Delegates will have the opportunity to
discuss practical applications of the technologies with existing users:
Arius3D colour laser scanner
CAVE Virtual Environment
UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC): a centre of excellence in human-computer
interaction
Slade School of Fine Art: use of a hand held scanner in art classes
Digital Petrie Exhibition (in the making)
Digital Manufacturing Center, Bartlett School of Architecture
The day concludes with a wine reception.

4 September The second day will feature talks and presentations on a range
of topics, including 3D colour laser scanning and standards, 3D objects in
virtual environments, 3D colour printing, the life cycle of an object and
digital repatriation.
More information:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/research/3Dscanning/conference2009/programme.html

The workshop is FREE to attend but numbers are restricted 50. Register now
to confirm your place. Booking closes on 15 August 2009.

We would be very pleased if you could confirm your participation as a
speaker and your interest as soon as possible to Lauren Sadler
(l.sadler@ucl.ac.uk).
Please save the date in your diary and we will be getting back to you with
more information.

Kind regards
Lauren Sadler, Departmental Administrator, UCL Museums and Collections
Mona Hess, Research Assistant, UCL Museums and Collections
Prof Stuart Robson, Department for Civil, Environmental and Geomatic
Engineering
Sally MacDonald, Director of UCL Museums and Collections

Publication date:

16 July2009

The report on the second cluster workshop Physical Encounters: What do we know about damage and loss? held on Tuesday 30 April 2009, at UCL Institute of Archaeology, London, is now online (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/conservation-c-22/workshop_2/report_2)

Publication date:


We will now post announcements and updates on our Twitter page as well as on our RSS feed. The announcements will be more or less the same on each, but Twitter may be more readily accessible for some of our community.

To find our page go to https://twitter.com/ConservationC22.

Publication date:

The conference for Cultural Encounters and Explorations: Conservation's 'Catch 22'  will take place on 23 September 2009 at UCL, Institute of Archaeology.

What’s the Damage? will aim to address questions arising from the three research cluster workshops and the blog (26 June - 3 July 2009), with the aim of deciding how we should take the issue of physical encounters with objects forward.

Publication date:

The blog discussion for Cultural Encounters Cultural Encounters and Explorations: Conservation's 'Catch 22' is now live..  Elizabeth Pye has submitted a 'position statement' to which all are welcome to contribute. Please feel free to question and extend the discussion! 

Publication date:

Understanding Complex Structures: The Conservation, Display and Interpretation of Lace and Natural Objects


This Science and Heritage Programme research cluster is holding its final workshop on 12 June at Wollaton Hall, Nottingham.  There are still places if you wish to attend.  The objective is to bring together representatives of a range of fields including curation, conservation, creative practice, multimedia and technology to find opportunities to work together in research projects or otherwise. 

Publication date:

The report on the first cluster workshop Physical Encounters: What do we mean by condition and access? held on Monday 30 March 2009, at UCL Institute of Archaeology,London, is now online (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/conservation-c-22/workshop_1/report_1)

Publication date:

OBJECT AND IDENTITY IN A DIGITAL AGE

The CHArt (Computers and the History of Art) Twenty-Fifth Annual Conference

Thursday 12 - Friday 13 November 2009, Birkbeck, University of London

We live in a time when our identities are increasingly fractured, networked, virtualised and distributed. The same appears to be true of our things. Objects are becoming more contingent, reconfigurable, distributable and immaterial.

For the 25th anniversary CHArt conference we are looking for papers that engage with these questions in relation to art practice, production, consumption, representation and display. We are interested in new notions of the identity of the artist, including those involving collaboration and anonymity; new conceptions and ontologies of the art object, as processual, virtual, or hybrid; new means of consumption and reception, whether in galleries and museums, in public spaces, or over networks of broadcast and narrowcast; and the challenges these transformations bring to the display of art and to its curation and access.

We also welcome papers looking at earlier parallel transformations such as, for example, those brought about by photography, or developments in printmaking.

We welcome contributions from all sections of the CHArt community: art historians, artists, architects and architectural theorists and historians, curators, conservators, scientists, cultural and media theorists, archivists, technologists, educationalists and philosophers.

Please email a three to four hundred word synopsis of the proposed paper with brief biographical information (no more than 200 words) of presenter/s by 30 May 2009 to Hazel Gardiner (hazel.gardiner@kcl.ac.uk).

*Please note that submissions exceeding the stated word count will not be considered*

Dr Charlie Gere
Chair, CHArt

CHArt (www.chart.ac.uk)
c/o Centre for Computing in the Humanities
Kings College, University of London
26 – 29 Drury Lane
London
WC2B 5RL

Publication date:


David Prytherch, Senior Research Fellow in Haptics and Computer Interfaces at Birmingham City University is looking for institutions and people who would wish to collaborate in a bid to the AHRC concerning the following project (call deadline 14 May 2009). Only an outline is required at this stage.

'We’ve been working on the background of this for some time. I believe the technology has important implications, not only for displays to visitors and making
collections accessible to vision impaired people, but also long term
implications for conservation strategies. Below is a very brief and
non-technical draft description of where we are coming from with this. I hope that the idea interests some of you.' (David Prytherch)

'Touching Ghosts in Museums' is a study investigating the potential for using haptic interface devices to provide touch experiences of virtual museum objects.

New technology is becoming increasingly commonplace in public institutions, and the use of additional sensory experiences, including touch communicated through simulations, is rapidly developing. Technologies from the area of Virtual Reality (VR), that provide force-feedback through hand held devices, are becoming small and cheap enough to be incorporated into museum exhibitions. However, whether these systems can truly add value to visitor experiences remains largely unexplored.

We have conducted preliminary testing to establish a case for further study initially focussed on certain fundamental questions such as:

Publication date:



The UCL Centre for Sustainable Heritage is pleased to announce the short course: Historic Paper - degradation and non-destructive testing, which will take place on 21 – 22 May 2009.

Delivered by Dr Matija Strlic, this theoretical and practical workshop is intended as a flash course for those interested in the processes of paper degradation and conservation.

Degradation of historic paper is a long-term process and is caused by a variety of agents. It is difficult to determine the lifetime of paper, yet the conservator needs this information to make a quantitative assessment of the quality of any conservation treatment. A number of non-destructive or micro-destructive methods of examination and modelling have been developed recently and these will be discussed.

Please visit the UCL Centre for Sustainable Heritage website (www.ucl.ac.uk/sustainableheritage) for further information and booking details.

Publication date:

Programme and abstracts from the first workshop are now available

Publication date:

We are delighted to announce that the Cultural Encounters and Explorations: Conservation's 'Catch 22' website is now live!

Search UCL News