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TV Documentaries








My New Hand

Christian Hills
Documentary telling the story of Britain's first hand transplant, carried out by surgeons at Leeds Infirmary on Boxing Day night 2012, from the moment Professor Simon Kay and his team decided to go ahead to the moment the patient was able to move the transplanted hand.
Medical Sciences




Pandemic: A Horizon Guide

BBC
In the wake of the swine flu outbreak, virologist Dr Mike Leahy uses over 50 years of BBC archive to explore the history of pandemics - infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and parasites.
Medical Sciences

Panorama - I'll Die When I Choose

BBC
Margo MacDonald, the firebrand, independent politician, is one of Scotland's most popular public figures. But she also has Parkinson's Disease and, earlier this year, she spoke openly of her desire to choose the moment of her death. Now, in this deeply personal film, she uncovers the truth about assisted dying, meeting those with illnesses like hers who are desperate to die, and exploring how British law could be changed to allow them to choose when they can.
Medical Sciences


Panorama - NHS for Sale

BBC
On 5 July 1948 the National Health Service was brought into existence, making free public health care available to all, funded by the tax system. To mark the 60th anniversary of the NHS, the BBC will be presenting a series of programmes and features. This programme will look at the increasing involvement of the private sector in the Health Service asking what it means of the future
Medical Sciences



Panorama - There's Something in the Air

BBC
Panorama talks to pilots who have almost passed out at the controls and passengers who say they've been made ill by toxic fumes. The air breathed on airliners is drawn past the engines and can become polluted by any leaks of engine oil. 'Fume events' are rare but there are no accurate figures of just how many occur each year. Panorama wanted to discover what was really in the air passengers, crew and pilots breathe on planes
Medical Sciences






Storyville - The English Surgeon

Geoffrey Smith
Geoffrey Smith's moving film follows Henry as he travels to Kiev to help Igor operate on a young man called Marian, who without surgery has just months to live. When Henry arrives, he faces a serious challenge - Marian must be awake when his tumour is removed, and Henry must use the most basic tools, including a Black and Decker drill.
Medical Sciences


Terry Pratchett - Living with Alzheimer's

Charlie Russell
Bestselling author Terry Pratchett has early onset Alzheimer's disease. And he wants Alzheimer's to be sorry that it ever caught him. In the second of this two-part series, Terry confronts his future living with the disease. He travels to America to witness first-hand how they are coping with the 'tsunami of Alzheimer's', and meets the unlikely doctor who stumbled across a controversial new treatment that he claims produces remarkable results in minutes.
Medical Sciences

The Battle to Beat Polio

BBC
Stephanie Flanders, former BBC economics editor, has a very personal interest in the battle to beat polio. Her father, Michael Flanders, one half of the world-famous singing duo of the 50s and 60s, Flanders and Swann, was paralysed by the infection when he was 21. He used a wheelchair for the rest of his life, and died early at 53 through complications caused by the disease. Stephanie was just six.
Medical Sciences

The Beauty of Diagrams - Episode 05: DNA

Marcus du Sautoy
Series in which mathematician Marcus du Sautoy explores the stories behind some of the world's most familiar and influential scientific diagrams. In the last hundred years, one diagrammatic image stands above all others. It represents a scientific breakthrough that has been voted the most significant in the 20th century, more important than penicillin or the first working computer. The double helix shows us what the structure of our DNA looks like. Francis Crick and James Watson announced their discovery in Nature magazine in April 1953, and their article included a diagram of the structure by Odile Crick. The image she drew has become so well known and loved that we now find it in a whole range of consumer products - there are double helix ties, dogs chews and even a perfume. So has the image of the double helix become so divorced from its original scientific setting that no one knows what it really is or what it stands for?
Medical Sciences