UCL CENTRE FOR LANGUAGES & INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION (CLIE)

LOGIN

Self-Access Centre - English - All - Search

121 results found!

TV Documentaries

Seven Ages of Britain (C4) - Episode 04: 410 AD - 1066

Channel 4
The gradual collapse of the Roman Empire led to the disintegration of Britannia. For the next 600 years people would watch their homelands become battlegrounds invaded and plundered by men from Scandinavia and northern Europe, hungry for power and land. This was a time of upheaval and chaos, but out of it came much of the Britain that we know today. Language and rule of law, state religion and faith in the market economy all originate from this period. This was also a time when England eventually became wealthy and independent, recognised as one of the prizes of western Europe.
TV-Recordings%%%History


Storyville - Murder on a Sunday Morning

BBC 4
Jacksonville, Florida, May 2000. Mary Ann Stephens is shot in the head at point blank range in front of her husband. Two hours later, a 15-year-old black American, Brenton Butler, is arrested walking down a nearby street. Jean-Xavier De Lestrade's Academy
Law


Storyville - The Law in these Parts

Ra'anan Alexandrowicz
Documentary looking at justice in the land inhabited by Palestinians and captured by Israel in the 1967 war. The occupation began with the idea that Israel's presence would be temporary. Israelis dispensed justice through military courts, but these still exist.
Law

Storyville - The Thin Blue Line

Errol Morris
Errol Morris broke cinematic ground with The Thin Blue Line, establishing a new genre in the non-fiction feature by creating a fascinating reconstruction and investigation of a brutal and senseless murder.
Law

Storyville: I Will Be Murdered

Justin Webster
This week’s Storyville chronicles an extraordinary story of murder, love and political conspiracy triggered when a video of a murdered Guatemalan lawyer surfaced on Youtube in which he foretold his own death and named the culprits.
TV-Recordings

Storyville: The Pirate Bay

Simon Klose
Storyville: Documentary telling the story of The Pirate Bay, the world's largest file sharing site which facilitates downloading of copyrighted material. The film follows the three Swedish founders of The Pirate Bay through their trial after they are taken to court by Hollywood and the entertainment industry, accused of breaking copyright law. Seeing themselves as technicians whose aim is to run the world's largest web platform, in scenes bordering on the absurdly comedic they claim that their actions are about freedom and not money.
TV-Recordings%%%Computer Science

The Story of Science: Power, Proof and Passion - Episode 04: Can We Have Unlimited Power?

BBC 2
Michael Mosley takes an informative and ambitious journey exploring how the evolution of scientific understanding is intimately interwoven with society's historical path. We are the most power-hungry generation that has ever lived. This film tells the story of how that power has been harnessed - from wind, steam and from inside the atom. In the early years the drive for new sources of power was led by practical men who wanted to make money. Their inventions and ideas created fortunes and changed the course of history, but it took centuries for science to catch up, to explain what power is, rather than simply what it does. This search revealed fundamental laws of nature which apply across the universe, including the most famous equation in all of science, e=mc2.
TV-Recordings%%%Chemistry%%%History




Timeshift - Crime and Punishment - 08 The Story of Corporal Punishment

BBC
Timeshift lifts the veil on the taboo that is corporal punishment. What it reveals is a fascinating history spanning religion, the justice system, sex and education. Today it is a subject that is almost impossible to discuss in public, but it's not that long since corporal punishment was a routine part of life. Surprising and enlightening, the programme invites us to leave our preconceptions at the door so that we may better understand how corporal punishment came to be so important for so long
Law

Timeshift - Crime and Punishment - 09 The Story of Capital Punishment

BBC
Timeshift digs into the archive to trace the extraordinary story of the ultimate sanction. At the beginning of the 19th century you could still be hanged in Britain for offences such as stealing a sheep or shooting a rabbit. Even children as young as seven were sent to the gallows. The last hanging in this country took place as recently as 1964. By opting for a dispassionate history rather than staging the usual polarised debate, the programme breaks new ground with its fascinating attention to detail, such as the protocols of the public execution or the 'science' of hanging. With contributions from both sides of the argument, it provides an essential guide to a subject that still divides us.
Law

Timeshift - Retrial by TV: The Rise and Fall of Rough Justice

BBC
It is almost exactly 30 years since the BBC's Rough Justice team began investigating miscarriages of justice. The programme can claim to have achieved the overturning of the convictions of 18 people in 13 separate cases, continuing sporadically for over 25 years until it was finally axed in November 2007. Timeshift looks at the creation of this extraordinary series and reveals what a shock to the system it was. Featuring contributions from many of those involved, it asks how it was that a television programme took it upon itself to question one of the oldest judicial systems in the world. This documentary is also an opportunity to look at how much television and journalism have changed since Rough Justice was first commissioned. The programme's makers were hired with an open-ended brief that would be almost impossible to repeat today. It may only be thirty years ago, but this is a glimpse into a bygone era.
Law




Unreported World - Tobacco's Child Workers

Channel 4
Unreported World travels to Malawi to reveal that children as young as three are being illegally employed to produce tobacco, much of it destined to be consumed by British smokers. Malawi's children suffer health problems from handling tobacco and some are trapped in bonded labour arrangements, leaving them unable to escape. Little seems to be being done to protect their health and wellbeing.
TV-Recordings%%%Politics & Public Policy


Unreported World - Burundi: Boys Behind Bars

Channel 4
Unreported World exposes the plight of hundreds of children in Burundi locked up for years without trial in adult prisons, among some of the most dangerous criminals in the country. And they meet one man who has dedicated his life to freeing them; Pierre-Claver Mbonimpa is the only hope many of these children have. Burundi has no juvenile justice system and children above the age of 15 are tried as adults. By law any child under that age should not be imprisoned, but in a country recovering from civil war and where record keeping is scant, many underage children are slipping through the net and are being locked up.
TV-Recordings%%%Politics & Public Policy

Unreported World - Colombia's Dying Tribes

Channel 4
Unreported World investigates how Colombia's indigenous people have been targeted in a string of massacres perpetrated by guerrillas, paramilitary groups and the security forces. Colombia's government claims success in its war against left-wing FARC guerrillas and in restoring law and order. But the country is still beset with a conflict that is killing thousands.
TV-Recordings%%%Politics & Public Policy

Unreported World - Greece: Reporter's Log

Channel 4
Following the journey migrants take as they try to smuggle themselves into Europe poses a unique set of challenges. First, you need to find the migrants. This isn’t a simple task, as my director Jacob Waite and I soon discovered. Although hundreds of thousands enter the EU from the east via Turkey every year, these are people who have dedicated themselves to being invisible. They are breaking the law and risking their lives to slip unseen across borders.
TV-Recordings%%%Politics & Public Policy

Unreported World - Mumbai's Party Police

Channel 4
Young clubbers in Mumbai are being arrested, assaulted and accused of being prostitutes in a police crackdown on the city's nightlife. Reporter Jenny Kleeman and director Alex Nott investigate why a policeman dubbed 'Inspector Killjoy' is now enforcing long-forgotten laws and how being caught up in the raids can change young women's lives forever.
TV-Recordings%%%Politics & Public Policy

Unreported World - Neighbours at War

Channel 4
Reporter Krishnan Guru-Murthy and director Adam Pletts manage to film on both sides of the lines in the Lebanese city of Tripoli, where Sunni Muslim fighters are besieging an Alawite neighbourhood in a conflict mirroring that happening in Syria.

Unreported World - Turkey: Killing for Honour

Ramita Navai
Unreported World travels to Turkey to investigate honour killings, which have now reached record levels with more than 200 girls and women killed in the past year alone. The programme highlights a chilling new development in which a new law outlawing honour killings may have led to a huge increase in girls being forced to commit suicide instead.
TV-Recordings%%%Politics & Public Policy



University Applications

Law 4th Edition (For entry to university and college in 2009)

UCAS , UCAS , 2008
This book helps you with the process of applying to study law at university of college.
University Applications

What About Law? Studying Law at University

Catherine Barnard, Janet O'Sullivan, & Graham Virgo , Hart Publishing , 2007
"What About Law?" counters the perception that law is a dry, dull subject. On the contrary, it shows how the study of law can be fun, intellectually stimulating, challenging and of direct relevance to students. Using a case study approach, the book introduces prospective law students to the legal system, as well as to legal reasoning, critical thinking, and argument.
University Applications