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TV Documentaries


Seven Wonders of the Industrial World - Episode 04: The Transcontinental Railway

Paul Bryers
By the middle of the 19th century, the benefits brought by the countless advances of the Industrial Age were gradually beginning to reach America, which soon developed a spectacular achievement of its own - the Transcontinental Railway, reaching right across the continent. With two teams, one building from the east and the other from California in the west, they battled against hostile terrain, hostile inhabitants, civil war and the Wild West. Yet in 1869, the two teams' tracks were joined, shrinking the whole American continent, as the journey from New York to San Francisco was reduced from months to days
Engineering




Speed Machines - Episode 01: The Great Ocean Liners.

Channel Four
The 1930s was a highpoint for ocean-going liners. Crossing the Atlantic by boat was the only way to reach the US, and competition between the French and British shipyards was never less than fierce, a focus for patriotic pride. The British Queen Mary and French Normandie epitomised the golden age of the ocean liners. They were among the floating Art Deco palaces that competed intensely to win the Blue Riband - a prize for the fastest Atlantic crossing. A Holy Grail for the two countries, this prize was also a great bit of marketing.
Engineering

Speed Machines - Episode 03: The Flying Boats

Channel Four
Back in the 1930s, two giant airlines began to span the globe, flying firstly mail and then passengers around the world. Pan American flew to Latin America and eventually across the Pacific to Asia. Britain's Imperial Airways linked the empire from Europe through the the Middle East to Africa, India and beyond. But crossing the North Atlantic, although potentially one of the most lucrative routes, proved more difficult. The flying boats themselves were glorious glamour pusses, transporting a handful of lucky souls around the world in fabulous luxury, standard bearers of a now mythical golden age of flight. This episode tells the story of the rivalry between Pan Am and Imperial Airways to get the first commercial airline service flying across the Atlantic - a race won just weeks before the outbreak of World War Two.
Engineering

Speed Machines - Episode 04: The Speed Boat Kings

Channel Four
The fourth episode in the series visits the fast, furious and all-too-often deadly powerboat races of the 1920s and 30s. In the biggest spectator sport of the time, the fastest men on water competed in gladiatorial combats in front of crowds of up to a million spectators. The Harmsworth Challenge was the America's Cup of the powerboat world, with intense rivalry between Britain, who relied on technological ingenuity, and America, who put their trust in boats powered by immensely powerful aircraft engines. It was a David and Goliath confrontation, which was only put aside when World War II loomed. But the powerboat technology survived to be adopted by the military, spawning the Royal Navy's fleet of speedy Motor Torpedo Boats and the US Navy's legendary PT patrol boat. Using previously unseen archive footage and personal testimony from those who were there, Speed Machines tells the story of this golden age of powerboat racing.
Engineering

Storyville: Knocking On Heaven's Door

BBC 4
George Carey's film shows how the Russian space programme was kick-started by a mystic who taught that science would make us immortal, and carried forward by a scientist who believed that we should evolve into super-humans who could leave our overcrowded planet to colonise the universe. Stranger still, Carey shows how those ideas have survived Communism and adapted themselves to the science of the modern world.
Engineering



Supersized Earth: Part 1 - A Place to Live

BBC
Supersized Earth traces the spectacular story of how humans have transformed our world in a generation. In this awe-inspiring three-part series, Dallas Campbell travels the globe, visiting the world's largest and most ambitious engineering projects, exploring the power of human ingenuity.
TV-Recordings%%%Engineering


The Challenger

William Hurt
When the space shuttle Challenger blew up in 1986, it was the most shocking event in the history of American spaceflight. The deaths of seven astronauts, including the first teacher in space Christa McAuliffe, were watched live on television by millions of viewers. But what was more shocking was that the cause of the disaster might never be uncovered. The Challenger is the story of how Richard Feynman, one of America's most famous scientists, helped to discover the cause of a tragedy that stunned America.
Engineering




The Satellite Story

BBC
Documentary celebrating the 50th anniversary of the first satellite, Sputnik, which launched the space age in 1957. The film explores how satellites have affected almost every aspect of our lives, from spy satellites and GPS transforming the military to the communications revolution kickstarted by Telstar. But recent events in China have revealed just how vulnerable we might be, for they suggest we might be on the verge of another new age, one of satellite terrorism.
Engineering

The Secret Life of the National Grid - Episode 01: Wiring the Nation

BBC
At the heart of Britain sits something so all pervasive we don't even notice it's there - the national electricity grid. This three-part series charts how our lives got wired and the impact electrification has had. The opening part takes us from the epic construction of the first grid in the 1920s and 30s to the challenge of making sure there is power at the flick of a switch today. Using rare archive and vivid personal accounts it reveals the heroic efforts, architectural masterpieces and engineering achievements behind the real power map of Britain. Contributors include author Will Self, urban planner Sir Peter Hall and grid veterans on how Britain first banished darkness and turned on the electric light.
TV-Recordings%%%Engineering

The Secret Life of the National Grid - Episode 03: Pulling the Plug

BBC
Miners, nuclear scientists, politicians, environmentalists and even the City have all wrestled for control of the national electricity grid and the power that it has brought. The final film in this history of the grid charts how it has been the battleground for conflicts that have changed and shaped Britain. Key players from the miners' strikes reveal why the industrial action of the 70s and 80s had such different impacts on electricity supply. The film also uncovers how Britain lost her lead in the field of nuclear power. Contributors include former conservative cabinet minister Lord Jenkin, author Will Self and veterans of all the different fuels. They examine the cost of our love affair with power and consider the perils of life without it.
Engineering

The Space Shuttle: A Horizon Guide

BBC
In 2011, after more than 30 years of service, America's space shuttle took to the skies for the last time. Its story has been characterised by incredible triumphs, but blighted by devastating tragedies - and the BBC and Horizon have chronicled every step of its career.
Engineering


Why the Industrial Revolution Happened Here.

BBC
Professor Jeremy Black examines one of the most extraordinary periods in British history: the Industrial Revolution. He explains the unique economic, social and political conditions that by the 19th century, led to Britain becoming the richest, most powerful nation on Earth. It was a time that transformed the way people think, work and play forever.
Engineering

UPCSE

Engineering Mathematics - A Programmed Approach - Third Edition

C.W. Evans , Stanley Thornes Publishers Ltd , 1997
This book is an essential resource for all students on first-year science and engineering degree and pre-degree courses.
Maths%%%UPCSE Books

Engineering Mathematics - Fifth Edition

K.A. Stroud , Palgrave Macmillan Ltd , 2001
This textbook includes a Foundation section making it suitable for all students, whatever their mathematical background. The theory is presented in a step-by-step fashion and with worked examples and exercises, making it ideal for self-study
Maths%%%UPCSE Books

Physics ( 2nd edition )

Jim Breithaupt , Palgrave Macmillan Ltd , 2003
An authoritative text providing a first course in physics for students on access or foundation programmes and non-specialist students on degree courses such as biological sciences, chemical sciences, engineering, mathematics and geology for whom physics is a subsidiary subject
UPCSE Books%%%Physics

Thomas' Calculus

George B. Thomas , Pearson Education Ltd , 2005
This book introduces students to the methods and applications of calculus, as well as the mathematical language needed for applying the concepts of calculus to numerous applications in science and engineering. It is excellent preparation for courses in differential equations, linear algebra, or advanced calculus.
Maths%%%UPCSE Books

Writing

Writing Up Research

Robert Weissberg & Suzanne Buker , Prentice Hall , 1990
This book is designed for students preparing to engage in scientific research. It provides instruction and practice in translating the results of research into clear, well-written reports. It is geared primarily to the writing of experimental research reports, theses, and dissertations in the natural and physical sciences, engineering, and the social sciences, including education. The material is also relevant for writing research proposals, literature reviews, summaries and abstracts.
Writing
  • 0-139-70831-6
  • 3308
  • Writing
  • 2 copies
  • C1 C2