Centre for Law, Economics and Society (CLES)

EVENTS

6 May 2016
The Fall and Rise of the Antitrust Class Action

18 to 20 May 2016, St Petersburg
Global Food Supply Chains and Competition Law

Date to be confirmed for end of May / beginning of June 2016
EU State Aid Law CPD course

8 June 2016, Brussels
Competition Policy at the Intersection of Equity and Efficiency
A special conference honouring the scholarship of Eleanor M. Fox (NYU)

9 June 2016
Getting Merger Control Clearances for Corporate Deals

For more information and to view past events, please go to the events pages.

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Contact Us

For general enquiries, please contact:

Tatjana Wingender
Administrator
+44 (0)20 3108 8484
t.wingender [at] ucl.ac.uk

For research project enquiries, please contact:

Professor Ioannis Lianos
+44 (0)20 3108 8346
i.lianos [at] ucl.ac.uk

Events

Please see below for upcoming events. Past events can be viewed here.

UCL Centre for Law, Economics & Society

6 May 2016

The Fall and Rise of the Antitrust Class Action

Speaker: Professor Spencer Weber Waller (Loyola University of Chicago)

Chair: Professor Ioannis Lianos (UCL Laws)

About the talk:
Antitrust class actions have narrowed significantly in the United States in recent years but still remain robust compared to aggregate litigation in the rest of the world. While the Supreme Court continues to narrow the doorway to class actions, the rest of the world is increasingly interested in creating new mechanisms for aggregate litigation to better support effective private damage litigation in competition cases, and in particular the large number of small claims cases that led to the class action boom in the United States in the first place. The challenge for the rest of the world will be to fashion new remedies consistent with the history, culture, substantive law, and procedural rules of their legal traditions rather than either adopt or reject the system that has evolved in the United States.

The lecture will provide an overview of the increasingly stringent requirements for antitrust class actions in the United States and a representative survey of the nascent movement toward collective actions abroad where competition cases have been at the forefront of the debate. The lecture will cover the standards for class certification under Rule 23 and recent Supreme Court cases tightening those standards. It will then analyse a separate line of Supreme Court cases which effectively eliminates class actions altogether when parties have entered into a contract requiring arbitration rather than litigation and further requires individual rather than collective arbitration proceedings.

We will continue with a survey of recent developments in the opposite direction outside the United States. This section examines ongoing changes in the EU, UK, other EU Member States, Mexico, and Canada to empower consumers and business with small claims in competition cases by creating collection action mechanisms of different types. We will also briefly discuss the decision of the EU to simply prohibit the type of forced arbitration clauses that the U.S. Supreme actively encourages. We will analyse the critical aspect of whether foreign class actions will thrive or whither on the vine – the need for an opt-out mechanism rather than the opt-in mechanism favoured in most jurisdictions outside the U.S. It is ironic that the rest of the world is struggling to figure out how best to empower plaintiffs to bring appropriate class action type proceedings while the U.S. Supreme Court remains principally concerned with how to restrain or eliminate the very same type of action.

Visit the event website for more information and to register.

Co-organizers: HSE-Skolkovo Institute for Law and Development & UCL Centre for Law, Economics and Society

18 to 20 May 2016, St Petersburg

Global Food Supply Chains and Competition Law

Second BRICS Competition Law Forum on Global Food Supply Chains and Competition Law

About the conference:
The idea of the conference is to engage closely with competition authorities from the BRICS countries but also beyond and to involve international academics from law and economics/sociology of markets in order to test our ideas and proceed to the publication of an edited volume on “Global Food Value Chains and Competition Law” to be submitted to an International Publishing House.

The conference will form part of a new BRICS initiative, the BRICS Joint Research Platform on Competition Law and Policy, which will be officially launched during the conference in St Petersburg by the heads of the BRICS Competition Authorities.

It also builds on the CLES@UCL research initiative on Global Food Value Chains and Competition Law: Towards “holistic” competition law?

The object of our study: Global Food Supply Chains
The food supply chain is generally depicted as composed by three main levels: agricultural production, industrial processing and wholesale or retail distribution. At a closer look, however, the food supply chain becomes more complex, involving a number of other stages and links that add value to the chain either in the form of goods or services inputs. The food industry is heavily dependent on the scarce resources like arable land, water and genetic resources (a limited biodiversity). At each level of the supply chain, firms as well as other organizational forms perform specific activities supplying goods or services. Moreover, at the same level there may be one or more firms performing the same or complementary activities, adding specific value at their stage of activity. The food supply chain, as a whole, originates therefore even before the agricultural sector, with the factor market (for example the seed provider) and ends with the final consumer. The power relations in the global food value chain are characterized by international actors and local producers operating within the geographic area determined by the logistics of the product. Issues of distribution of the total surplus value of the global food chain are thus paramount and should inevitably influence competition law enforcement.
Our research focuses on global value chains, because of our emphasis on issues of distribution of the total surplus value of the chain and inequality of bargaining power in the context of these transnational supply chains, which, according to us, competition law should tackle. Hence, the use of the terminology of global value chains carries, for us, normative implications. Yet, we would like this workshop to offer us the possibility to also engage with more mainstream competition law work focusing on global supply chains as a fact with which competition law should grapple with.

Visit the event website for more information

UCL Centre for Law, Economics & Society

Date to be confirmed for
end of May / beginning of June 2016

a two-day CPD course

EU State Aid Law

Course Convenor and Presenters:

  • Dimitrios Kyriazis (Oxford)
  • Alex Stratakis (Baker & McKenzie LLP)

Accreditation
6 CPD points are available for this course from SRA and BSB

About the course:

EU Law prohibits any unapproved aid granted by a Member State or through State resources in any form whatsoever which distorts or threatens to distort competition by favouring certain undertakings or the production of certain goods, in so far as it affects trade between Member States. This so-called “State aid prohibition” is an essential part of the EU’s internal market and competition rules. This is why the EU Treaties grant the European Commission a monopoly over approved state aid and strong investigative tools.

Global Competition Law Centre and UCL Centre for Law, Economics & Society

8 June 2016, Brussels

Competition Policy at the Intersection of Equity and Efficiency
A special conference honouring the scholarship of Eleanor M. Fox (NYU)

About the conference:
This symposium on Competition Law at the Intersection of Equity and Efficiency, co-organized by the Centre for Global Competition Law at the College of Europe and the Centre for Law, Economics and Society aims to discuss Eleanor Fox’s contribution to the field of competition policy. Leading competition law scholars from around the world will comment on Eleanor Fox’s scholarship, reflecting on her legacy, while engaging with the broader debate of the relation between “efficiency” and “equity” in competition law.
The symposium aims to provide critical insights into the work of one of the world’s most prominent competition law scholar of the past four decades by providing leading global competition law experts, Eleanor’s colleagues and friends, the opportunity to engage with the psyche of competition law and the balance, for some, or Faustian Pact for others, it has reached between “efficiency” and “equity”.

Visit the event website for more information and to register.

UCL Centre for Law, Economics & Society

9 June 2016
a one-day CPD course

Getting Merger Control Clearances for Corporate Deals

Course Convenor and Presenters:

  • Kyriakos Fountoukakos (Herbert Smith Freehills LLP)
  • Peter Rowland (Herbert Smith Freehills LLP)
  • Nick Root (Herbert Smith Freehills LLP)

About the course:
Merger control is an essential part of a competition practitioner’s every day work and is also of importance to other advisors (corporate lawyers, bankers) involved in transactions. It needs to be considered in every corporate deal including private acquisitions of whole companies, shares or assets, public takeover bids, minority investments in companies and joint venture agreements. This is because merger control will impact key aspects of a transaction: the transaction time table (“when can I close the deal?”) and even the “deliverability” of a transaction (“can I do the deal?” “Will remedies be imposed?”). More than 100 countries around the world now have merger control laws. Most of them, like the EU regime, are “mandatory” and “suspensory” regimes: a filing must be made and the deal cannot close before clearance has been received from the relevant regulators. Despite the central importance of merger control for competition lawyers, corporate lawyers, investment bankers and businesses, merger control is a topic that is often not taught in detail and from a hands-on perspective in undergraduate or even post-graduate courses.

Visit the event website for more information and to register.

   

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