Centre for Law, Economics and Society (CLES)

EVENTS

The CLES is currently planning the following events:

More Than Money: The Economics of Payments and Its Regulation
Speaker: Professor David Evans, University College London
11 March 2015

The Microsoft Antitrust Cases: Retrospective and prospective
Speakers: Andrew I. Gavil, Professor, Howard University School of Law and former Director, Office of Policy Planning at Federal Trade Commission and
Harry First, Charles L. Denison Professor of Law. Co-Director, Competition, Innovation, and Information Law Program. New York University School of Law
4 February 2015

The Challenging Nature of Cartel Criminalisation: A Case Study of the UK
Speaker: Dr Peter Whelan, University of Leeds
3 February 2015

For more information, please go to the events pages.

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Contact Us

For general enquiries, please contact:

Tatjana Wingender
Administrator
+44 (0)20 7679 1407
t.wingender [at] ucl.ac.uk

For research project enquiries, please contact:

Dr Ioannis Lianos
+44 (0)20 7679 1028
i.lianos [at] ucl.ac.uk .

Papers

For more working papers, please visit the CLES Research Paper Series section on this website.

Events

Please see below for current events. Past events can be viewed here.

   
UCL Centre for Law, Economics & Society

More Than Money: The Economics of Payments and Its Regulation

Speaker: Professor David Evans, University College London

11 March 2015, 13:30 - 19:00

Accreditation:
This CPD course is accredited with 4.5 CPD hours the SRA / BSB
About this course:

The payments industry is going through a period of significant disruption. Innovation is creating new opportunities, but also risk, for payments companies. At the same time new and proposed regulations are forcing traditional firms to change how they do business and putting up roadblocks to startups. Meanwhile the lines between the payments industry and others is blurring as high technology companies from Apple to Uber are inserting themselves into the mix. What does this mix of innovation and regulation mean for payments companies and the lawyers who represent them?

This course will examine the organisation of the modern payments industry with particular focus on the economics of this industry including the role of multi-sided platforms and the behavioural economics of payments and borrowing; examine key innovations including mobile money, virtual currencies, and the integration of virtual and physical payments; and examine the economic foundations of competition policy and consumer protection for payments.

The course will include presentations from several executives of payments companies including startups.

Read more about the course and register

Download the course brochure

UCL Centre for Law, Economics & Society

The Microsoft Antitrust Cases: Retrospective and prospective

Speakers:

  • Andrew I. Gavil, Professor, Howard University School of Law and former Director, Office of Policy Planning at Federal Trade Commission
  • Harry First, Charles L. Denison Professor of Law. Co-Director, Competition, Innovation, and Information Law Program. New York University School of Law


4 February 2015, 17:00 - 19:30

Accreditation:
This event is accredited with 2.5 CPD hours with the SRA / BSB

About the event:

The Microsoft antitrust saga has been a defining moment in the evolution of US and European competition law in the era of post-1990s information and Internet revolution. Its influence on the design of modern competition law standards for monopolization/abuse of dominance has been remarkable. In addition to its economic significance, the case has also provided one of the first examples of the challenges that globalization and the diffusion of competition law set to competition law enforcement, including the need to manage the interaction between various institutions of enforcement at a global scale. In their remarkable study of the Microsoft antitrust cases, professors Andrew I. Gavil and Harry First provide extremely valuable insights into the significance of this case for competition law and policy in the 21st century. The conference will provide an opportunity to engage with the argument of the authors and hear from some key players in the development of the Microsoft cases their retrospective on the case and their prospective analysis on its implications for competition law enforcement.

Overview of the book from the publisher’s website: http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/microsoft-antitrust-cases

Read more about the event and register

UCL Centre for Law, Economics & Society

The Challenging Nature of Cartel Criminalisation: A Case Study of the UK

Speaker: Dr Peter Whelan, University of Leeds

3 February 2015, 13:00 - 14:00

Accreditation: This event is accredited with 1 CPD hour with the SRA (BSB pending)
About this lecture:

There is a growing tendency within the EU to criminalise ‘hard core’ cartel activity. One of the EU Member States that currently imposes criminal sanctions (imprisonment) for cartel activity is the UK. Although the Cartel Offence has been on the UK legislative books for more than ten years, efforts to enforce it to date have been subjected to considerable criticism. The UK Government recently conceded that enforcement of the Cartel Offence had been ineffective and that legislative change was required in order to reform the Cartel Offence so that it would become fit for purpose. Following a lengthy consultation process, legislative reform of the Cartel Offence was undertaken. On 1 April 2014, Section 47 of the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013 entered into force, ensuring significant changes to the criminal UK Cartel Offence. Dr Whelan’s presentation examines in detail the specific reforms of the Cartel Offence and argues that, although considerable improvement has been made, the UK authorities currently have at their disposal a criminal offence that is fundamentally flawed and unworkable in practice. He therefore argues that further reform is advised.

Read more about the event and register

Page last modified on 13 jan 15 10:08