Department of Greek & Latin
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Degrees

On this page you will find links to some primary sources of information about the study of the Classical world at UCL, such as the Classical World prospectus and the general UCL prospectus, but you will also find some information not in either prospectus, such as further details of our degree programmes. On the Admissions page you will find more detailed information about the admissions process. If you can't find the information you are looking for, or if you have any questions at all, please do not hesitate to email the Admissions Tutor, Dr Jenny Bryan.

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About our degree programmes

The Department of Greek and Latin offers a number of degree programmes involving study of the Ancient World: Classics (Q800), Classics with Study Abroad (Q801), Ancient World Studies (Q805), and Ancient World Studies with Study Abroad (Q806). All four programmes provide access to the same wide range of linguistic, literary, historical, and archaeological course but they differ in their emphasis, and in the rules concerning which courses, or which type of course, you are obliged to study. The primary differences are as follows:

  • The Classics programmes (Classics Q800, Classics with Year Abroad Q801) are focused on the study of Latin and Greek language and literature, and require students to have an A-level or equivalent in one or both ancient languages. Every year, half your study must involve courses in Latin and Greek, though there is a considerable amount of flexibility as regards the other half.
  • The Ancient World Studies programmes (Ancient World Studies Q805, Ancient World Studies with Study Abroad Q806) are our most flexible degree programmes, providing students with an almost entirely free choice of courses covering classical literature, history and archaeology. Students are not required to have studied Latin or Greek.
  • There are Joint Degree programmes which combine study of either Latin or Greek with other areas of study.  Latin is available as part of the Modern Language Plus degree (and can be combined with languages such as French and Spanish).  Greek is available as part of the Philosophy with Greek degree.  For these courses students typically take half of their courses with us and the other half with their home department


Please click on the individual degrees to get further details of the course content

Please note that our prospectus also includes information on degree programmes centred around Ancient History, Archaeology and Philosophy. For more detailed information, please visit the relevant departmental websites: Department of History, Institute of Archaeology, Department of Philosophy.

About our courses

Some basic details

Most degree programmes at UCL are built out of a series of units. Each course is worth either 0.5 or 1.0 units, depending on the amount of work involved. Each year you must take courses to a total value of 4 units - so you could be taking anything from eight 0.5 unit courses to four 1.0 unit courses. You can find some more details here.

Classics / Classics with Study Abroad

For the Classics (Q800) degree programme, which requires students to have an A-level (or equivalent) in Latin or Ancient Greek, students must take at least one unit of Latin-based courses, and at least one unit of Greek-based courses. In addition, there are some compulsory core-courses in the first and second years involving texts in translation. The structure for Classics with Year Abroad (Q801) is identical, except that students spend their third year abroad, and have their final year at UCL in their fourth year. This gives the following structure:

  Year One Year Two Final Year
1 One unit of Latin-based courses One unit of Latin-based courses One unit of Latin-based courses
2
3 One unit of Greek-based courses One unit of Greek-based courses One unit of Greek-based courses
4
5 Interpreting Greek Literature Classics and Literary Theory (student choice)
6 Interpreting Latin Literature (student choice) (student choice)
7 (student choice) (student choice) (student choice)
8 (student choice) (student choice) (student choice)


Ancient World Studies (Q805) / Ancient World Studies with Study Abroad (Q806)

The Ancient World Studies (Q805) degree programme is our most flexible programme, and it is one of the most flexible degree programmes covering the Ancient World in the UK. This course is open to those who do not have any previous experience of Latin of Greek languages - though all students must take one and a half-units in an ancient language during their degree. In the first year, all students must do at least one unit of either Latin or Greek - they usually continue with this same language in the next year to complete the 1.5 unit requirement (hover mouse for note). All students must take one history course and one archaeology course in their first year. There is also one compulsory core-course. In the third year, students must take the Extended Essay option as one of their course choices. The Ancient World Studies with Study Abroad (Q806) programme is identical, except that students spend their third year abroad, and have their final year at UCL in their fourth year.

  Year One Year Two Year Three
1 One unit of Latin or Greek Half-unit of same ancient language Essay on an Approved Subject
2 (student choice) (student choice)
3 Life and Death in the Ancient World (student choice) (student choice)
4 At least one history course (student choice) (student choice)
5 At least one archaeology course (student choice) (student choice)
6 (student choice) (student choice) (student choice)
7 (student choice) (student choice) (student choice)
8 (student choice) (student choice) (student choice)



Sample Course Choices Below are further tables illustrating the ways in which our programmes can be tailored to suit the interests and expertise of individual students. You can click on most course titles to read a description of the course; please note that not all the courses listed run in any given year. 

Classics - Sample One

  Year One Year Two Year Three
1 Latin Texts 1 Latin Texts 2 Virgil
2
3 Greek Texts 1 Greek Texts 2 Homer
4
5 Interpreting Greek Literature Classics and Literary Theory Roman Historians
6 Interpreting Latin Literature Greek Translation
7 Introduction to the Study of Language Latin Prose Composition Latin Verse Composition
8 The Romans and their past Latin Palaeography Greek Comedy


This student arrived at UCL with A levels in Latin and Greek. In his first year he took Latin Texts I as his compulsory unit of Latin language, and Greek Texts I as his compulsory unit of Greek language. He progressed from Latin Texts I in his first year, to Latin Texts II in his second, to a prescribed text course in his final year, in which he also took a number of other high-level Latin courses. In Greek, he followed a similar progressions: from Greek Texts I in his first year, to Greek Texts II in his second, to a high-level Greek course (Homer) in his final year. Like all classicists, he took the core literature survey courses Interpreting Greek Literature and Interpreting Latin Literature in the first year, and the Classics and Literary Theory course in the second. As his interests were very much in the field of classical languages and literature, almost all his course choices were courses offered by the Department of Greek and Latin.

Classics - Sample Two

  Year One Year Two Year Three
1 Latin Texts 1 Latin Texts 2 Ovid
2
3 Greek for Beginners A Intermediate Greek A Greek Texts 1
4 Greek for Beginners B Intermediate Greek B
5 Interpreting Greek Literature Classics and Literary Theory Essay on an approved subject
6 Interpreting Latin Literature Latin Translation The Etruscans
7 Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology Archaeology of War Egypt in the World
8 Advanced Drawing Sources for Greek History Painting

This student came to UCL with Latin GCE A level, and no prior knowledge of Greek. In her first year, she took Latin Texts I as her compulsory unit of Latin language, progressing to Latin Texts II in her second year and to a prescribed text in her third year. In Greek, she progressed from Greek for Beginners in her first year, to Intermediate Greek in the second, to Greek Texts I in her final year. Like all classicists, she took the core literature survey courses Interpreting Greek Literature and Interpreting Latin Literature in the first year, and the Classics and Literary Theory course in the second. This student was also able to pursue her interest in art, taking two courses outside the Classical World syllabus in her first and second years, and also to cultivate interests in archaeology and history.



Ancient World Studies - Sample One

  Year One Year Two Year Three
1 Latin for Beginners A Intermediate Latin A Essay on an Approved Subject
2 Latin for Beginners B Roman Coinage Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics
3 Life and Death in the Ancient World Roman Britain: History and Archaeology
4 Greek Myth Greek Tragedy
5 Introduction to Greek Archaeology Magic, Religion, and Reason in Greek Art & Archaeology Greek Sculpture
6 Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
7 The Mediterranean World 800-500BC The Classical Greek City The Roman Family
8


This student began the degree with no prior knowledge of Latin or Greek. For the one unit of compulsory language, she chose Latin for Beginners A and B. Another half-unit was taken up by the compulsory Life and Death course. With her remaining courses, she pursued interests in classics, archaeology and ancient history, fulfilling the requirement for at least one course in Archaeology and History. In her second year, she continued with Latin at Intermediate level, to fulfil the language requirement (one and half units in the same language). She then devoted most of her time to archaeology. In her final year, she decided to devote more time to classical literature, though still maintaining her interests in archaeology and history.

Ancient World Studies - Sample Two

  Year One Year Two Year Three
1 Latin for Beginners A Intermediate Latin A Essay on an Approved Subject
2 Latin for Beginners B Intermediate Latin B Latin Palaeography
3 Life and Death in the Ancient World Roman Authors: Roman Love Poetry Greek Authors: Homer
4 Roman Life and Thought Greek Comedy Greek Tragedy
5 Introduction to Greek Archaeology Magic, Religion, and Reason in Greek Art & Archaeology Archaeology of War
6 Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology The Etruscans
7 The Mediterranean World 800-500BC Roman Coinage Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics
8 Italian Level 1a


This student also began the degree with no prior knowledge of Latin or Greek. For the one unit of compulsory language, he also chose Latin for Beginners A and B, and again, one half-unit was taken up by the compulsory Life and Death course. The remainder of his first-year choices were spread between classics, archaeology and history, fulfilling the requirement for at least one course in Archaeology and History. In his second year, he began to specialise in language and literature, and also took one half-unit course (Italian Language) from outside the Ancient World syllabus. The majority of his final-year courses involved classical literature, though he still kept an interest in history and archaeology.


And finally...

Once again, if you can't find the information you are looking for, or if you have any questions at all, please do not hesitate to email the Admissions Tutor, Dr Jenny Bryan, who will attempt to answer your questions as quickly as he can.

Page last modified on 12 oct 11 14:21