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Gender Equality Charter mark

Bronze award holder
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Published: Sep 8, 2014 11:18:34 AM

The Department of Greek and Latin welcomes new students

We look forward to welcoming new students on Monday 22 September 2014. Please see our BA Induction Programme, our MA Induction Programme, and our PhD Induction Programme
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Published: Sep 4, 2014 4:23:49 PM

UCL Classics #3 in the UK

In the 2014-15 Guardian Rankings
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Published: Jun 4, 2013 10:23:34 AM

Marigold Norbye

Marigold Norbye


Teaching Fellow in Medieval Latin and Latin Palaeography

Office hours: by appointment (please e-mail)

Email: m.norbye@ucl.ac.uk

Research interests: medieval manuscripts; medieval chronicles; the history of history writing; medieval libraries; the transmission of ancient history

I was born and brought up in France, then studied Classics and Italian at Cambridge (Clare College). After a detour via the world of business, I returned gratefully to academe to do a Masters in Medieval Studies at UCL, followed by a PhD, where I worked on the manuscripts of a fifteenth-century French genealogical chronicle and how they were used. Since 2004, I have been lecturing in Manuscript Studies and Palaeography (the deciphering of ancient and medieval scripts) at UCL and for University of London palaeography courses. I am particularly interested in manuscript books and their readers, and on how history, including ancient history, was transmitted and interpreted over the centuries between Antiquity and Renaissance.


Publications:

  • ‘Genealogies and dynastic awareness in the Hundred Years War. The evidence of A tous nobles qui aiment beaux faits et bonnes histoires.’, Journal of Medieval History, 33 (2007), pp. 297-319.
  • ‘A popular example of ‘national literature’ in the Hundred Years War: A tous nobles qui aiment beaux faits et bonnes histoires’, Nottingham Medieval Studies, 51 (2007), pp. 121-42.
  • ‘A tous nobles qui aiment beaux faits et bonnes histoires’ – the multiple transformations of a fifteenth-century French genealogical chronicle’, in The Medieval Chronicle, vol. 5, ed. by Erik Kooper, pp. 175-96.
  • ‘Genealogies in Medieval France’, in Broken Lines: Genealogy in Medieval Britain and France, ed. by Raluca L. Radulescu and Edward Donald Kennedy (Turnhout: Brepols, 2008), pp. 79-101.

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