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Courses in Latin 2012-13

LEVEL ONE

LEVEL TWO

LEVEL THREE

LEVEL ONE

LATN 1003 LATIN FOR BEGINNERS A (0.5 unit)

Teachers: Dr Stephen Colvin and PGTAs for the group sessions

Class hours: five one-hour classes per week, Term 1

Meets: All 5 hours are compulsory

Plenary sessions: Mondays 1-2, Tuesdays 5-6, & Thursdays 5-6

PGTA groups: Wednesdays 9-10 & Fridays 4-5

Assessment: continuous assessment (90%) based on two in-class tests plus weekly quizzes 10% (best 5 out of 7 to count).

Pre-requisites: none.

Course Text: A. Keller & S. Russell, Learn to Read Latin (Yale UP 2004)

Students need to purchase the Text book (but the Work-book is optional): Part i for Term 1, Part ii for Term 2.

An introduction to the classical Latin language, including the study of grammar, principles of sentence construction and the reading of selected texts. The course aims to provide students with a knowledge of classical Latin language and principles of sentence construction sufficient to translate simple passages of Latin prose into English and simple English phrases and sentences into Latin. Two classes per week will be split into three small groups, each group taught by a Postgraduate Teaching Assistant. By the end of the course, students are expected to have reached a level approximately equivalent to chapter 5 of A. Keller & S. Russell, Learn to Read Latin (Yale UP 2004).  

Recommended preliminary reading: Introduction to A. Keller & S. Russell, Learn to Read Latin (Yale UP 2004). 

LATN 1004 LATIN FOR BEGINNERS B (0.5 unit)

Teachers: Dr Antony Makrinos and PGTAs for the group sessions

Class hours: five one-hour classes per week, Term 2

Meets: All 5 hours are compulsory

Plenary sessions: Mondays 9-10, Tuesdays 1-2, & Thursdays 9-10

PGTA groups: Wednesdays 9-10 & Fridays 4-5

Coursework requirements: preparation, exercises.

Assessment: continuous assessment (40%) based on in-class tests and coursework; one three-hour examination paper (60%)

Pre-requisites: LATN 1003 Beginners Latin A or the equivalent.

Course Text: A. Keller & S. Russell, Learn to Read Latin (Yale UP 2004)

An introduction to the classical Latin language, including the study of grammar, principles of sentence construction and the reading of selected texts. The course aims to provide students with a knowledge of classical Latin language and principles of sentence construction sufficient to translate simple passages of Latin prose into English and simple English phrases and sentences into Latin. Two classes per week will be split into three small groups, each group taught by a Postgraduate Teaching Assistant. By the end of the course, students are expected to have reached a level approximately equivalent to chapter 10 of A. Keller & S. Russell, Learn to Read Latin (Yale UP 2004).  


LEVEL TWO

LATN 2003 INTERMEDIATE LATIN A (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Peter Agócs and PGTAs

Class hours: four one-hour classes per week, Term 1

Meets: All 4 hours are compulsory

Plenary sessions: Mondays 4-5 & Thursdays 5-6

PGTA sessions: Tuesdays 5-6 & Fridays 4-5.

Assessment: continuous assessment (100%) based on two in-class tests.

Pre-requisite: LATN 1004 Beginners Latin B or Latin to GCSE standard or equivalent.

Course Text: P.V Jones and K.C. Sidwell, Reading Latin, Cambridge 1998.

A study of Latin grammar and syntax, for those who have completed Beginners Latin B or already have Latin to GCSE standard. The course aims to develop students' knowledge of the Latin language from a level comparable to that achieved at the end of the Beginners' course to a point where they will have mastered the majority of regular syntactical constructions and be able to read continuous prose texts incorporating these. Two of the four classes per week will be split into two groups, each group taught by a Postgraduate Teaching Assistant.

By the end of the course students should understand the syntactical constructions covered in P.V. Jones & K.C. Sidwell, Reading Latin (Cambridge University Press, 1998), up to section 4G, and be able to demonstrate this understanding in translation

both from Latin into English and from English into Latin. They should also be able to read, understand, and translate into English adapted passages of original Latin of the level of difficulty included in Reading Latin sections 4A-4G.

LATN 2004 INTERMEDIATE LATIN B (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Antony Makrinos and PGTAs

Class hours: four one-hour classes per week, Term 2

Meets: All 4 hours are compulsory

Plenary sessions: Mondays 4-5 & Thursdays 5-6

PGTA sessions: Tuesdays 5-6 & Fridays 4-5.

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (60%), coursework assessment (40%) based on two in-class tests (20% each).

Pre-requisite: LATN 2003 Intermediate Latin A or equivalent.

Course Text: P.V Jones and K.C. Sidwell, Reading Latin, Cambridge 1998.

The course aims to develop students' knowledge of the Latin language from a level comparable to that achieved at the end of Intermediate Latin A to a point where they will have mastered all regular syntactical constructions and will be able to read and translate original Latin.

The course covers Reading Latin sections 5A-5G. By the end of the course students should understand all the syntactical constructions covered in P.V. Jones & K.C. Sidwell, Reading Latin (Cambridge University Press, 1998), and be able to demonstrate this understanding in translation both from Latin into English and from English into Latin. As part of the prepared translation, they should also be able to read, understand, and translate into English passages of original Latin of the level of difficulty found in (for example) Catullus' shorter poems or Caesar.

LATN 2008 LATIN TEXTS 1 (1 unit) – Terms 1 and 2

Or LATN 2008A LATIN TEXTS 1A (0.5 unit) – Term 1 only

Teachers: Maria Kanellou (Term 1) & Bobby Xinyue (Term 2)

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week

Meets: Thursdays 5-6 & Fridays 4-5, Terms 1 & 2

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%).

Pre-requisite: LATN 2004 Intermediate Latin B or Latin to A-level standard or equivalent.

Term 1 Pliny, Letters

Term 2 Catullus 61-68

Grammar text for both terms:

R. Colebourn, Latin Sentence and Idiom. A Composition Course, London 1948 (repr. Bristol 1987).

This course may be taken as whole unit (two texts) or a half-unit (one text). Students taking the course as a half unit are expected to take it in the first term. Anyone starting the course in the second term may do so only following advice from the Departmental Tutor.

A study of Classical Latin language, involving the reading and translation into English of prose and verse texts, exercises in grammatical analysis and stylistic criticism, the translation of English sentences into Latin, and the scansion of hexameter and elegiac verse. The course is designed for those who already have a good A-level knowledge of the language or have passed Intermediate Latin B. It prepares students for studying whole works in the original language and therefore provides a step towards Latin Texts 2. The course consists of two elements:

(i) reading of extended sections of relatively easy texts of classical Latin prose and verse which are prepared in advance and worked through in detail in class. This will include comment on style and grammar.

(ii) The systematic study and revision of the principles of Latin language, syntax and metre, which are best learned by practice in translating English into Latin.

LATN 2011 LATIN TRANSLATION (0.5 unit)

Teachers: Dr Fiachra Mac Góráin (Term 1) and Dr Dimitra Kokkini (Term 2)

Class hours: one class per week.

Meets: Mondays 10-11, Terms 1 and 2

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%).

Pre-requisite: normally LATN 2004 Intermediate Latin B

A course of exercises and discussions designed to improve fluency of unprepared translation into English from Latin prose and verse authors. Weekly classes provide practice in unseen translation of a wide-ranging selection of Latin prose and verse authors. Class work focuses upon discussion of grammar and grammatical style, common pitfalls and hints of translation techniques as well as practical exercises.

By the end of the course students will have had sufficient practice to be able to apply their knowledge and thus make reasonable assumptions regarding the content of an unseen passage.

LATN 2012 LATIN PROSE COMPOSITION I (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Fiachra Mac Góráin

Class hours: one class per week.

Meets: Tuesdays 12-1, Terms 1 & 2

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%).

Pre-requisite: LATN 2008 Latin Texts 1.

This course aims to enable students to acquire the principles and techniques of writing Latin prose (translation from English) through critical analysis of Latin prose authors (Caesar, Cicero, Livy) and study of a prose composition text book.  It is not a morphology or syntax revision course, and a secure grounding in Latin grammar will be assumed. Some passages will be worked on in class. Others will be prepared in advance and discussed. The use of an approved Latin to English dictionary (but not an English to Latin or a combined dictionary) will be permitted in the examination. At the end of the course students will have an ability to translate, under timed examination conditions, a passage of English prose into Latin prose.

LATN 2013 LATE & MEDIAEVAL LATIN (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Marigold Norbye

Class hours: one class a week

Meets: Mondays 1-2, Terms 1 & 2

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%)

Pre-requisite: At least LATN 2004 Intermediate Latin B plus an acquaintance with a Romance language (preferably French) is an advantage.

A survey designed to show the range, variety and quality of Latin prose and poetry from the late empire to the Middle Ages. The linguistic element will concentrate on pointing out some basic differences between Medieval Latin and Classical Latin; students should be sufficiently proficient in Latin to appreciate these differences and to translate the texts. More attention will be placed on introducing the historic and cultural context of the texts and their authors on the assumption that students will have a limited knowledge of the Middle Ages. The course aims to introduce students to a selection of late and Medieval Latin writings and to equip them to appreciate basic linguistic characteristics as well as the cultural and historical backgrounds of these texts.

LATN 2014 LATIN PALAEOGRAPHY (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Marigold Norbye

Class hours: one two-hour class a week, Term 2.

Meets: Mondays 4-6

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%).

Pre-requisite: At least LATN 2004 Intermediate Latin B.

Due to the practical nature of this course, there are only 20 places available.

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the materials and methods employed in the production of written documents on stone, papyrus and parchment and to familiarize them with the historical development of Roman scripts. These include Roman capitals and cursives, and Insular, Merovingian, Caroline, Beneventan and Gothic scripts. This course will also train students in the skills of identifying different writing styles and transcribing Latin texts.



LATN2015 HISTORY OF THE LATIN LANGUAGE (1 unit)

Teacher: Dr. Stephen Colvin

Class hours: one two-hour class per week

Meets: Tuesdays 9-11, Terms 1 and 2

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%)

Pre-requisites: normally LATN 2004 Intermediate Latin B or Latin to A-level standard or equivalent.

The course will trace the history of the Latin language from its Indo-European origins to the Renaissance. It will cover the early linguistic history of the Italian peninsular; the emergence and eventual domination of the dialect of Latium; the history of the literary language in the classical period and evidence for the spoken varieties (this will include an introduction to the historical phonology and morphology of the language, as well as a study of the vocabulary); the history of the Latin in the post-classical period and the emergence of regional vernaculars; mediaeval Latin and neo-Latin; Dante and the language question in Italy. The syllabus will include a selection of inscriptions and literary texts from all periods

Preliminary reading:

JANSON, T. (2004), A Natural History of Latin (Oxford)

LEVEL THREE

LATN 3008 LATIN TEXTS 2 (1 unit) – Terms 1 and 2

Or LATN 3008A LATIN TEXTS 2A (0.5 unit) – Term 1 or 2

Teacher: Dr Antony Makrinos (Term 1) and Dr Mairead McAuley (Term 2)

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week.

Meets: Wednesdays 11-12 & Fridays 10-11

Coursework requirements: reading, preparation of two set texts.

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (75%) and 2 coursework essays (12.5% each)

Pre-requisites: normally LATN 2008/2008A Latin Texts 1/1A

Term 1

Plautus, Amphitruo
Term 2

Petronius, Satyricon
This course may be taken as whole unit (two texts) or a half-unit (one text in either the first or the second term).

The aim of this course is to broaden and deepen students' knowledge of two major texts or important genres of Latin literature in the original language and further to develop students' ability to read and understand Latin texts in their literary and historical context.


LATN3433B CICERO (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Professor Gesine Manuwald

Class hours: one two-hour class per week

Meets: Thursdays 11-1, Term 2

Coursework requirements: Reading of secondary literature and regular preparation of Latin text in advance of seminars.

Assessment: one two-hour examination paper (75%) and one piece of assessed coursework (25%) This course provides an introduction to Cicero as a politician and orator as well as to key elements in the history and political life of the Roman Republic, by means of a close look at Cicero’s writings referring to his consular year. The course will focus on reading (in the original Latin) a group of speeches, the four Catilinarian Orations, paying particular attention to Cicero’s argument and political strategy and their adaptation in speeches on similar topics given before different bodies. There will be supplementary reading in English of some of Cicero’s letters, of excerpts from other speeches and of references to Cicero’s epic about his consulship (available on Moodle). This will allow for discussion of issues such as aims and methods of Cicero’s shaping of his consular persona, his presentation of ‘historical facts’, his view of the Roman res publica or the possible reasons for the publication of these speeches and their later collection in a corpus. Recommended edition: A.R. Dyck (ed.), Cicero. Catilinarians, Cambridge 2008 (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics).

Recommended preliminary bibliography: D.R. Shackleton Bailey,  Cicero, London 1971; E. Rawson, Cicero. A Portrait, London 1975; C. Steel, Reading Cicero. Genre and Performance in Late Republican Rome, London 2005 (Duckworth Classical Essays).
Pre-requisites: normally LATN 2008/2008A Latin Texts 1/1A
Class hours: one two-hour class per week


LATN3437B OVID (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Mairéad McAuley

Class hours: one two-hour class per week

Meets: Fridays 2-4, Term 2

Coursework requirements: Reading of secondary literature and regular preparation of Latin text in advance of seminars.

Assessment: one two-hour examination paper (75%) and one piece of assessed coursework (25%).

Pre-requisites: a good knowledge of Latin.

A study of the works of Ovid, ranging from the Amores and Heroides to the exile poetry. Particular reference will be made to the social, literary and historical context of the poems; Ovid's attitude towards poetry and genre; aspects of Ovid's style. The course aims to develop students' understanding of the dynamics of Ovidian poetry, especially the way in which he alludes to other works of literature in order to create particular literary effects. It will also develop students' ability to perform a close reading of a literary text, and understand the ways in which a particular text may relate to social and historical contexts.

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