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Courses in Greek 2012-13

LEVEL ONE

LEVEL TWO

LEVEL THREE


LEVEL ONE

GREK 1001 GREEK FOR BEGINNERS A (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Nick Gonis and PGTAs for the group sessions.

Class hours: five one-hour classes per week, Term 1.

Meets: All 5 hours are compulsory

Plenary sessions: Tuesdays 4-5, Wednesdays 12-1 & Thursdays 1-2

PGTA groups: Mondays 10-11, & Fridays 12-1

Assessment: continuous assessment (90%) based on two in-class tests plus weekly quizzes 10% (best 5 out of 7 to count).

Pre-requisites: none.

Course text: Athenaze Book 1, M.Balme and G.Lawall, Oxford 1990.

An introduction to the ancient Greek language, including the study of grammar, principles of sentence construction and the reading of selected texts. It aims to provide students with a knowledge of Classical Greek language and principles of sentence construction sufficient to translate simple passages of Greek prose into English and simple English phrases and sentences into Greek. Two classes per week will be split into three small groups, each group taught by a Postgraduate Teaching Assistant. By the end of the course, students are expected to have reached a level approximately equivalent to the end of chapter 9 of the course text, Athenaze Book 1, by M.Balme and G.Lawall, Oxford 1990.

GREK 1002 GREEK FOR BEGINNERS B (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Nick Gonis and PGTAs for the group sessions.

Class hours: five one-hour classes per week, Term 2.

Meets: All 5 hours are compulsory

Plenary sessions: Tuesdays 4-5, Wednesdays 12-1 & Thursdays 1-2

PGTA groups: Mondays 10-11, & Fridays 12-1

Coursework requirements: reading, preparation, exercises.

Assessment: continuous assessment (40%) based on two in-class tests and one three-hour examination paper (60%)

Pre-requisite: GREK 1001 Beginners Greek A or the equivalent.

Course text: Athenaze Book 1, M.Balme and G.Lawall, Oxford 1990.

An introduction to the ancient Greek language, following on from Greek for Beginners A, and including the study of grammar, principles of sentence construction and the reading of selected texts. The course aims to provide students with a knowledge of Classical Greek language and principles of sentence construction sufficient to translate simple passages of Greek prose into English and simple English phrases and sentences into Greek. Two classes per week will be split into three small groups, each group taught by a Postgraduate Teaching Assistant. By the end of the course, students are expected to have reached a level approximately equivalent to the end of the course text, Athenaze Book 1, by M.Balme and G.Lawall, Oxford 1990.


LEVEL TWO

GREK 2001 INTERMEDIATE GREEK A (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Jenny Bryan and PGTAs

Class hours: four one-hour classes per week.

Meets: All 4 hours are compulsory.

Plenary sessions: Tuesdays 4-5 & Thursdays 10-11

PGTA sessions: Thursdays 4-5 & Fridays 9-10, Term 1

Coursework requirements: reading, preparation, exercises.

Assessment: continuous assessment (100%) based on two in-class tests.

Pre-requisite: GREK 1002 Beginners Greek B or the equivalent.

Course text: Athenaze Book 2, M.Balme and G.Lawall, Oxford 1990.

This course provides second-year work in Greek for those who have taken a Beginners' course, or have a (perhaps rusty) GCSE; depending on their course of study and tutorial advice, students may take both parts of this course or part A only. It aims to develop students' knowledge of the Greek language from a level comparable to that achieved at the end of the Beginners' course to a point where they will have mastered the majority of regular syntactical constructions and be able to read continuous texts incorporating these. Two of the four classes per week will be split into two groups, each group taught by a Postgraduate Teaching Assistant.

By the end of the course students should understand the syntactical constructions covered in sections 17 to 25 of Athenaze 2 of M. Balme and G. Lawall, (Oxford University Press, 1990), and be able to demonstrate this understanding in translation both from Greek into English and from English into Greek.

GREK 2002 INTERMEDIATE GREEK B (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Rosa Andújar and PGTAs

Class hours: four one-hour classes per week.

Meets: All 4 hours are compulsory.

Plenary sessions: Tuesdays 4-5 & Thursdays 10-11

PGTA sessions: Thursdays 4-5 & Fridays 9-10, Term 2

Coursework requirements: reading, preparation, exercises.

Assessment: continuous assessment (40%) based on two in-class tests and one three-hour examination paper (60%)

Pre-requisite: GREK 2001 Intermediate Greek A or equivalent.

Course text: Athenaze Book 2, M.Balme and G.Lawall, Oxford 1990.

This course aims to develop students' knowledge of the Greek language from the level achieved at the end of Intermediate Greek A to a point where they will have mastered all regular syntactical constructions and be able to read and translate original Greek prose and verse texts. Two of the four classes per week will be split into two groups, each group taught by a Postgraduate Teaching Assistant.

By the end of the course students should understand all the syntactical constructions covered in book 2 of M. Balme and G. Lawall, Athenaze (Oxford University Press, 1990), and be able to demonstrate this understanding in translation both from Greek into English and from English into Greek.

GREK 2006 GREEK TEXTS 1 (1 unit) - Terms 1 and 2

Or GREK 2006A GREEK TEXTS 1A (0.5 unit) – Term 1 only.

Teachers:  Andreas Serafim (Term 1) and Rosie Harman (Term 2)

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week.

Meets: Tuesdays 11-12 & Thursdays 10-11 (Term 1)

Tuesdays 9-10 & Thursdays 9-10 (Term 2)

Coursework requirements: reading, preparation, exercises.

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%).

Pre-requisite: Greek to A-level standard or GREK 2002 Intermediate Greek B.

Term 1

Plato, Apology

Text: P. Miller and C. Platter (eds.) Plato's Apology of Socrates (2010, University of Oklahoma Press)

Term 2

Homer, Odyssey 5

Text: W.B. Stanford (ed.) Homer, Odyssey 1-12 (1996, London)

Grammar text for both terms: M.A. North and A.E. Hillard, Greek Prose Composition, Duckworth. 

This course may be taken as whole unit (two texts) or a half-unit (one text). Students taking the course as a half unit are expected to take it in the first term. Anyone starting the course in the second term may do so only following advice from the Departmental Tutor.

A study of Classical Greek language, involving the reading and translation into English of prose and verse texts, exercises in grammatical analysis, the translation of English sentences into Greek, and some verse scansion. The aim of the course is to develop students' understanding of classical Greek grammar and syntax such that, by the end of the course, they are able to read independently Greek prose and verse texts. The course is designed for those who already have a good A-level knowledge of the language or who have passed Intermediate Greek B. It prepares students for studying whole works in the original language and therefore provides a step towards Greek Texts 2.

The course consists of two elements: reading of relatively easy texts of classical Greek prose and verse which are prepared in advance and worked through in detail in class; and the systematic study and revision of the principles of Greek language and syntax, which are learned by practice in translating English into Greek. By the end of the course, students should be able to read independently Greek prose and verse texts.

GREK 2009 GREEK TRANSLATION (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr. Jenny Bryan (term 1) and Dr Ruey-Lin Chang (term 2)

Class hours: one class per week.

Meets: Wednesdays 12-1, Terms 1 & 2

Coursework requirements: weekly passages for translation.

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper

Pre-requisite: GREK 2002 Intermediate Greek B or equivalent

A course of exercises and discussions designed to improve fluency of unprepared translation into English from Greek prose and verse authors. Weekly classes provide practice in unseen translation of a wide-ranging selection of Greek prose and verse authors. Classwork focuses upon discussion of grammar and grammatical style, common pitfalls and hints of translation techniques as well as practical exercises.

By the end of the course students will have had sufficient practice to be able to apply their knowledge and thus make reasonable assumptions regarding the content of an unseen passage.


LEVEL THREE

GREK 3006 GREEK TEXTS 2 (1 unit) - Terms 1 and 2

Or GREK 3006A GREEK TEXTS 2A (0.5 unit) – Term 1 or 2.

Teachers: Dr Peter Agócs (Term 1) and Dr Nick Gonis (Term 2).

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week.

Meets: Tuesdays 5-6 & Thursdays 4-5

Coursework requirements: reading, preparation.

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (75%) and 2 pieces of assessed coursework (12.5% each) for 1 unit; one three-hour examination paper (75%) and one piece of assessed coursework (25%) for 0.5 unit.

Pre-requisite: normally GREK 2006/2006A Greek Texts 1/1A or equivalent.

Term 1

Aristophanes, Clouds In the first term we will read this famous comedy of Aristophanes, focussing both on literary and theatrical aspects and the intellectual and philosophical background. We will read the text from the edition with commentary (available from OUP) of K.J. Dover. Participants will be expected to have read the weekly section of the text in Greek, and to come prepared to talk about it. A detailed weekly schedule and supplementary bibliographies will be provided at the start of the term,.

Some useful preparatory reading: A.M. Bowie, Aristophanes: Myth, Ritual and Comedy (Cambridge 1993); K.J. Dover, Aristophanic Comedy (London, 1972); M.Revermann, Comic Business (Oxford, 2006); J. Robson, Aristophanes, an introduction (London, 2009); and M.S. Silk, Aristophanes and the Definition of Comedy (Oxford, 2000).

Term 2

Lysias and Demosthenes

This course may be taken as whole unit (two texts) or a half-unit (one text in either the first or the second term).

The aim of this course is to broaden and deepen students' knowledge of two major texts or important genres of Greek literature in the original language and further to develop students' ability to read and understand Greek texts in their literary and historical context. 


GREK3305 MYCENAEAN GREEK (1 unit)

Class hours: one two-hour class per week.

Meets: Thursdays 2-4, terms 1 and 2

Teacher: Dr Stephen Colvin

Coursework requirements: reading, preparation

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%)

Pre-requisites: a very good knowledge of ancient Greek.

This course has two parallel aims: it introduces the script, language, and history of the Linear B tablets of Mycenaean (Bronze Age) Greece; in order to do this effectively it also serves as a basic introduction to Greek historical phonology and morphology. By extension, this will include an introduction to Indo-European studies.

We shall discuss the historical and social context of the tablets and the methods used to interpret their subject matter. Core topics will include: the syllabic script of the tablets; the history of writing in the ancient Near East and the graphic representation of Greek; the position of Mycenaean among the Greek dialects; and the relevance of the tablets to our understanding of Homeric Greek.

The texts will be drawn from J. T. Hooker, Linear B: an Introduction (1980), and supplemented by more recent analyses and publications of finds. Weekly problem sets will be assigned and must be completed by students enrolled in the course.

GREK 3307 GREEK PAPYROLOGY (0.5 unit) BA/MA

Teacher: Dr Nick Gonis

Class hours: one two-hour class per week

Meets: Tuesdays 2-4, Term 1

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%)

Pre-requisites: normally GREK 2006 Greek Texts 1.

An introduction to the study of Greek papyri, documentary as well as literary, each class will focus on a small number of texts, one or two of which will be studied in detail on a photograph. The texts are chosen to illustrate the development of Greek bookhands and cursive scripts; to examine formal aspects of the transmission of Greek literature on papyrus; and to give an idea of the range of documentary types available as sources for the history of Graeco-Roman Egypt.

GREK 3401B HOMER (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Peter Agócs Meets: Tuesdays 2-4, Term 2

Class hours: one two-hour class per week.

Coursework requirements: reading, weekly preparation of text

Assessment: one two-hour examination paper (75%) and one piece of assessed coursework (25%).

Pre-requisites: normally GREK 2006/2006A Greek Texts 1/1A.

In this course we will follow Odysseus' adventures on land and sea as he struggles to return to Ithaka from Troy and to save the lives of his doomed comrades. We will read the Greek text together (some parts will be left for independent study). Areas to investigate will include the nature of epic, the traditionality of Homer; the differences between oral and written texts and the cultures that make them; the epic hero (Odysseus); the social meaning and ethics of storytelling; fiction and truth; poetry and 'song'; ideas of travel, space and time; monsters and gods; death and the afterlife; magic and religion; Homeric society and ethics; men and women in epic; and the impact of Odysseus' myth on the later tradition in poetry and art.

We will aim to cover Books 9-12 of the Odyssey in the original Greek. We will use the Oxford Classical Texts edition of T. Allen. Commentaries: Stanford's (Odyssey I-XII, in print from Bristol Classical Press and available also used) and vol. II of the 'Oxford Orange' (A. Heubeck and A. Hoekstra, A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey, Oxford 1989) will be useful, as will Monro's Homeric Grammar, and the Homeric Dictionary of G. Autenrieth. Recommended secondary readings: A.B. Lord, The Singer of Tales (1960; re-issued since); J. Griffin, Homer on Life and Death (1980); K. Reinhardt, 'The Adventures in the Odyssey', in S. Schein, Reading the Odyssey: Selected Interpretive Essays (Princeton, 1996): 63-132; and S. Goldhill, 'The Poet Hero: Language and Representation in the Odyssey' in: The Poet's Voice (Cambridge, 1991): 1-68.

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