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Published: Jun 4, 2013 10:23:34 AM

Courses in Translation

The following courses are taught in English Translation:

LEVEL ONE (1st years ONLY)

LEVEL TWO (suitable for 2nd/3rd years)

LEVEL THREE


LEVEL ONE

CLAS 1201 GREEK MYTH: ITS USE AND MEANING (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Laura Swift

Class hours: one two-hour class per week.

Coursework requirements: reading, one assessed essay.

Meets: Mondays 2-4, Term 2

Assessment: One essay of up to 2,000 words (40%), one three-hour examination paper (60%).

Pre-requisites: none.

An introduction to the study of Greek mythology in its literary, social, historical and philosophical context. The aim of this course is to introduce students to leading concepts and persons of Greek mythology, which forms an important foundation of Greek art, literature and ideas. Everyone is fascinated by Greek myths: but how did these extraordinary stories arise? What was their purpose? Did the Greeks really believe them and what are our sources for them? This course looks at a range of Greek myths and suggests some answers to these questions. Backed up by slides and copies of relevant texts, the course will survey the subject broadly, evaluating some modern interpretations of myth.

Recommended Course Texts

M. P. O. Morford and R. J. Lenardon, Classical Mythology. Oxford, OUP.

E. Csapo, Theories of Mythology. Malden, Blackwells.

CLAS 1202 ROMAN LIFE & THOUGHT (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Antony Makrinos

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week.

Coursework requirements: reading, two assessed essays.

Meets: Mondays 2-3 & Fridays 10-11, Term 1

Assessment: continuous assessment (100%) based on two essays of up to 2,000 words each (50% each essay).

Pre-requisites: none.

A survey of everyday life under the Roman empire, considering, on the basis of the surviving words and remains of Roman antiquity, the physical realities, daily life, man-made environment, national institutions and intellectual attitudes of Roman civilisation. This will include aspects of life such as the Roman calendar and time-reckoning, the education system, attitudes towards the gods, attitudes towards the Greeks, philosophical schools, the courts, and the Games.

CLAS 1204 APPROACHES TO THE ANCIENT WORLD (0.5 unit)

Course Leader: Dr Fiachra Mac Góráin + other members of teaching staff

Class hours: one two-hour class per week.

Coursework requirements: reading, two assessed essays.

Meets: Fridays 2-4, Term 1

Assessment: continuous assessment (100%) based on two essays of up to 2,000 words each (50% each essay).

Pre-requisites: none.

This course is intended only for first-year students on Ancient World degree programmes and is not open to students from other departments. Students on Classics degree programmes may be admitted but subject to the permission of the Classics Departmental Tutor.

An interdisciplinary study of literary, historical and archaeological approaches relating to aspects of death and to life in the sense of an individual's life history in the ancient world. The course is a mandatory first-year course within the AWS degree programme and aims to introduce first-year students to the different approaches to the same topic adopted by the three disciplines of archaeology, history and literary studies, and to demonstrate to them the extent to which these different approaches can be reconciled. As such, this course is intended to be the central focus of the first year studies, teaching basic analytical techniques which students are then expected to apply to other courses, as appropriate to the particular discipline.

CLAS 1205 INTERPRETING GREEK LITERATURE (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Emmanuela Bakola

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week.

Meets: Mondays 11-12 & Wednesdays 10-11, Term 1.

Coursework requirements: reading of selected texts in translation; one assessed essay.

Assessment: One essay of up to 2,000 words (40%), one three-hour examination paper (60%).

Pre-requisites: None; no knowledge of Greek required.

This course is compulsory for all first year Classics/Latin with Greek/Greek with Latin/Classics with Study Abroad students and therefore may be limited in space to students from other degree programmes.

A broad-sweep survey across ten centuries of Greek literature starting from Homer and Hesiod in the eight century BC up to the Hellenistic Age of poetry and the Greek novel. All readings are in translation.

Topics included in this broad survey course are: Homer and Hesiod; lyric poetry; the development of scientific and prose literature; Herodotus and Thucydides; Greek tragedy; Greek Comedy; trends in ancient literary criticism; early Greek philosophy. Plato and Aristotle; Hellenistic epic, elegy, epigram and bucolic; and the Greek novel.

Twice weekly classes take as a starting point selected readings from major authors; the format is mixed lecture and discussion. The course will provide basic information and a chronological and thematic framework and is intended as an introduction to ancient Greek literature and theoretical approaches to literature. It will also introduce students to authors and genres of which they might not otherwise have experience. Students will be expected to equip themselves with specified translations of some works which are cheaply available in paperback; other texts will be supplied as handouts.

CLAS 1206 INTERPRETING LATIN LITERATURE (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Matthew Robinson

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week.

Coursework requirements: reading of selected texts in translation; one assessed essay.

Meets: Mondays 11-12 & Wednesdays 10-11, Term 2.

Assessment: One essay of up to 2,000 words (40%), one three-hour examination paper (60%).

Pre-requisites: None; no knowledge of Latin required.

This course is compulsory for all first year Classics/Latin with Greek/Greek with Latin/Classics with Study Abroad students and therefore may be limited in space to students from other degree programmes.

A broad-sweep survey of Roman literature, covering the principal authors and genres and starting from the beginnings of early Latin literature, through the Republican period and into early Imperial Rome. All readings are in translation. This course aims to provide students with a chronological and thematic framework for further study of ancient Latin literature. Topics will include the Roman theatre, satire, Roman epic and challenges to epic, historiography; lyric and love poetry; declamation and oratory; and the birth of the novel.

Twice weekly classes take as a starting point selected readings from major authors; the format is mixed lecture and discussion. The course will provide basic information and a chronological and thematic framework and is intended as an introduction to Latin literature and theoretical approaches to literature. It will also introduce students to authors and genres of which they might not otherwise have experience. Students will be expected to equip themselves with specified translations of some works which are cheaply available in paperback; other texts will be supplied as handouts.

CLAS 1301 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Stephen Colvin

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week

Meets: Mondays 12-1 & Tuesdays 1-2, Term 2

Coursework requirements: reading and weekly exercises

Assessment: one three-hour examination paper (100%)

Pre-requisite: none

The course is intended for first-year members of language departments and for anyone else interested in the two central themes of how languages work and how they change. Starting with a bird's-eye view of the history of language study from the ancient world to the present day, it goes on to consider such topics as: Sound and meaning in language: how they work.  The difference between language and dialect, and the notion of correctness in language. What is meant by saying that languages are related to each other? How and why do they change?

Course text: AITCHISON, J. (2010), Linguistics (Teach Yourself: London)

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LEVEL TWO

CLAS 2107 GREEK COMEDY (0.5 unit)

[likely to alternate with GREEK TRAGEDY in 2012/13]

Teacher: Professor Chris Carey

Class hours: one two-hour class per week

Meets: Thursdays 11-1, Term 2.

Coursework requirements: reading of selected texts in translation; one assessed essay.

Assessment: One essay of 2,500 words (40%), one three-hour examination written paper (60%).

Pre-requisites: None.

This course will provide students with an introduction to the major ancient genre of comedy and will enable them to understand Greek comedy both in its historical context and as a timeless example of the importance of comedy. General and thematic topics may include: the origins of comedy and its ritual context; the dramatic festivals of Athens; the staging and performance of comedy (including evidence from archaeology and vase-painting); the development of the genre; the travesty of myth in comedy; the nature of humour; the role of abuse and obscenity; self-referentiality, parody, intertextuality and allusion; plot-construction and characterisation; audience-reception and dramatic illusion; the function of the chorus.

CLAS 2110 GREEK HISTORIOGRAPHY

Teacher: Dr Rosie Harman

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week.

Meets: Wednesdays 11-12 & Fridays 11-12, Term 1.

Assessment: One essay of up to 2,500 words (40%) plus one three-hour examination paper (60%)

Pre-requisites: No knowledge of Greek or Latin language is required for this course.

This course provides a literary and historical examination of a selection of the writings of the ancient Greek historians (including a look at some texts, e.g. poetic texts, not obviously or usually categorized as history, such as the New Simonides). The main period covered will be roughly 500 BC to AD 100: Herodotus and his predecessors via Thucydides, Xenophon, Callisthenes, the Alexander historians and Polybius through to Plutarch. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the problems of writing about the past (problems first explicitly faced by the Greeks), and to enable them by close reading in translation to appreciate the literary qualities of the texts discussed and to understand the ways in which the Greek historians interacted with each other and with writers in different genres.

CLAS 2111 GREEK AUTHORS: HOMER (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Fiachra Mac Góráin

Class hours: one two-hour class per week.

Meets: Tuesdays 2-4, Term 1

Assessment: One essay of up to 2,500 words (40%), one three-hour examination paper (60%).

Pre-requisite: none.

This course involves the study of major literary genres of importance for the European literary tradition in translation. It is suitable for students of Classics as well as outside Classics, because it aims to help students to read widely and to engage with a broad range of literary-critical issues.

The course will focus on Homer’s Odyssey and Iliad, but will also include reference to other archaic epic (e.g. Hesiod). Issues discussed will include the composition of oral poetry, structure, structure, plot and character, the role of the gods, issues of gender and social values, the reception of Homer in later ages.

Recommended translations are those in the Penguin or Oxford World's Classics series (by Hammond, or Rieu & Rieu & Jones, or Fitzgerald for the Iliad; by Rieu & Rieu, or Shewring, for the Odyssey).

CLAS 2112 ROMAN AUTHORS: ROMAN LOVE POETRY (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Professor Maria Wyke

Class hours: one two-hour class per week

Meets: Wednesdays 10-11 & Thursdays 3-4, Term 1

Assessment: One essay of up to 2,500 words (40%), one three-hour examination paper (60%).

Pre-requisite: none

This course involves the study of major literary genres of importance for the European literary tradition in translation. It is suitable for students of Classics as well as outside Classics, because it aims to help students to read widely and to engage with a broad range of literary-critical issues.

Currently the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the genre of Roman love poetry (in translation). It aims to introduce the principal characteristics of the genre in its various stages of development, and to locate love poetry within the wider social and literary contexts of first-century Rome. We shall see how Roman love poets respond to the historical and political situation of their time, and engage with contemporary attitudes to morality, gender and sexuality. Discussion of broader thematic issues will alternate with case studies of the works of particular poets, including Catullus, Propertius, Tibullus and Ovid.  Attention will also be paid to the relationships between Latin love poetry and other literary genres, such as Roman comedy, especially epic.

Recommended texts are:

(1) Guy Lee (Trans) Catullus: The Complete Poems Oxford World’s Classics 1998 ISBN13 978-0-19-283587-1

(2) Guy Lee (Trans) Propertius. The Poems. Oxford World’s Classics 1999 ISBN13 987-0-19-283573-4

(3) A.D. Melville (trans.) Ovid. The Love Poems. Oxford World’s Classics 1998 ISBN 0-19-283633-1.[4] Elegies by Tibullus, trans. Guy Lee 1982 ISBN 090520509X or The Penguin Tibullus, trans. Philip Dunlop 1972 ISBN 0140442669.

A useful and lively introduction to the genre is R. O. A. M. Lyne, The Latin Love Poets (Oxford, 1980; repr. 1996).

CLAS 2113 WORLD OF LATIN LETTERS (0.5 unit)

[likely to alternate with ROMAN EPIC in 2012/13]

Teacher: Professor Gesine Manuwald

Class hours: one two-hour class per week

Meets: Mondays 2-4, Term 2

Coursework requirements: reading, one assessed essay.

Assessment: One essay of up to 2,500 words (40%), one three-hour examination written paper (60%).

Pre-requisites: None.

The surviving body of letters from the ancient world is extraordinarily rich and diverse. From official imperial correspondence to fictionalised letters embedded in larger works (particularly historiography and the novel), letters, whether real or invented, can in different ways inform, teach, entertain, and shock. The genre is remarkably flexible, incorporating pieces written in prose or verse, and in Latin or Greek. As the boundaries of the Greco-Roman world expanded under the empire, individuals found that they needed to communicate over considerable distances, and the 'epistolary habit' really came into its own. The ubiquitous presence of letters in real life (even pieces faked for the purposes of propaganda) in turn guaranteed a receptive audience for literary letters. This course will offer a survey of the traditions and evolution of the epistolary genre, analysing samples from Cicero, Horace, Ovid, Seneca the Younger, Pliny the Younger, Fronto and elsewhere. For individual letters, we will consider, as appropriate, issues such as characterisation, rhetorical strategy, imagery, humour, manipulation, and emotional response (whether of the original addressee or the wider audience). Anyone wishing to get a flavour of the topic is advised to read the introduction of Michael Trapp, Greek and Latin Letters: An Anthology with Translation (Cambridge 2003). Some of the letters in this volume will form the set texts, but xeroxes of additional material will be provided where appropriate.

CLAS 2115 CLASSICS AND LITERARY THEORY (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Dr Matthew Hiscock

Class hours: one two-hour class per week.

Meets: Mondays 11-1, Term 1

Coursework requirements: reading of selected texts in translation; one assessed essay.

Assessment: One essay of 2,500 words (40%), one three-hour written examination paper (60%).

Pre-requisites: None.

The course is compulsory for the degrees in Classics, Classics with Study Abroad, Latin with Greek/Greek with Latin but is also available to students taking Ancient World. This survey course builds on the first year courses Interpreting Latin Literature and Interpreting Greek Literature and is designed to provide a general critical background to the author and theme-based literature courses taught both in the original language and in translation. The course will analyse ways in which a range of modern critical techniques (including reception theory, narratology, feminist criticism, structuralism, post-colonialism) can enhance our reading of Greek and Latin texts. Emphasis will be on the application of different approaches to specific texts across a range of Greek and Roman authors, periods and genres. Preliminary reading:

Bennett, Andrew and Royle, Nicolas (1999) Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory (Harlow) Eagleton, Terry (1995) Literary Theory: An Introduction (Oxford)

CLAS 2116 ANCIENT GREEK RELIGION

Teacher: Dr Rosie Harman

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week.

Meets: Tuesdays 1-2 & Fridays 1-2, Term 2.

Assessment: One essay of up to 2,500 words (40%), one three-hour examination paper (60%).

Pre-requisites: None; no knowledge of ancient Greek required.

This is an introductory course on ancient Greek religion, a basic understanding of which is essential for the study both of Greek history and of Greek literature (especially but not only poetry – epic, tragedy and the poetry of Pindar). But in this area the ancient literary sources take much for granted, so that we need to go to inscriptions for some of the material; translations of relevant texts (literary and inscriptional) will be provided where appropriate. The course will concentrate on primary evidence, but modern anthropological and comparative work will be exploited as well: Greek religion is very much a ‘growth area’ at present and some of the most exciting work being done in classical studies is on Greek religion broadly defined.

Topics covered will be: the gods; heroes; sacrifice; festivals; myth; prophecy, oracles and divination; the afterlife; post-classical developments especially ruler-cult.

CLAS 2201 ATHENIAN LAW 1 (0.5 unit)

Teacher: Professor Chris Carey

Class hours: one two-hour class per week, Term 2

Meets: Thursdays 2-4

Coursework requirements: Reading of selected materials in translation, two assessed essays.

Assessment: Two essays of up to 2,500 words each (50% each).

Pre-requisites: None; no knowledge of Greek required.

This course offers a general introduction to the law and law courts in classical Athens. It will examine the way the legal system operated and the political role it fulfilled under the democracy and will explore a number of literary texts (principally oratory but also comedy and political and philosophical works) both as sources of law and legal practice and as examples of ways in which the system is exploited in practice. Recommended reading: D M MacDowell, The Law in Classical Athens, Cornell University Press (London 1978)

CLAS 2205 THE DIALOGUES OF PLATO (1 unit)

Teachers: Dr Jenny Bryan and Dr Anne Sheppard (Royal Holloway)

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week (including LiveNet)

Meets: Tuesdays 12-1 (Livenet) & Fridays 12-1, Terms 1 & 2

Assessment: Two essays of up to 2,500 words each (40%) plus one three-hour examination paper (60%)

Pre-requisites: No knowledge of Greek or Latin language is required for this course.

This is an intercollegiate course based at UCL, taught jointly by Dr Jenny Bryan of UCL and Dr Anne Sheppard of Royal Holloway. There are two lectures/classes per week, both at UCL, one using LiveNet, the interactive video link between RHUL and UCL, and the other a lecture.

The aim of the course is to study the contribution made by Plato to philosophical thought, as an integral part of the ancient Greek cultural achievement; to consider the Platonic dialogue as a literary form; and to investigate the bearing that the second of these topics has upon our interpretation of the first.

The first half of this course studies the early and middle dialogues of Plato; the second half moves on to the set text (Plato’s Theaetetus) together with a more general study of Plato’s later dialogues. For the Theaetetus you will need the translation by M.J. Levett, revised and with introduction by M.F. Burnyeat, The Theaetetus of Plato (Hackett 1990), or the slimmer volume containing only the Levett/Burnyeat translation (Hackett 1992).

Preliminary reading: Plato’s earlier dialogues - try to read some or all of Apology, Euthyphro, Crito, Laches, Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno and Phaedo before the course starts, in any convenient translation. The later dialogues, including Republic and Philebus, should be left until after the start of the course. If you also have time to read a general modern book on Plato, possibilities include:

T. Irwin, Classical Thought Chs. 5 and 6

W.J. Prior, Virtue and Knowledge Chs. 2 and 3

C.J. Rowe, Plato

D.J. Melling, Understanding Plato

R.M. Hare, Plato.


LEVEL THREE

CLAS 3202 THE PHILOSOPHY OF ARISTOTLE (1 unit) BA/MA

Teachers: Dr Anne Sheppard and Dr Jenny Bryan

Class hours: two one-hour classes per week (including LiveNet)

Meets: Tuesdays 3-4 (Livenet) & Fridays 2-3, Terms 1 & 2

Assessment: Two essays of up to 2,500 words each (40%) plus one three-hour examination paper (60%)

Pre-requisite: no knowledge of Greek is required

A study of the philosophy of Aristotle with considerable emphasis on ethics and psychology and including also logic, physics, metaphysics, biology and politics. The set text in translation will be Nicomachean Ethics.

The course aims to develop students' understanding of philosophical arguments and their ability to evaluate them as arguments both in their own terms and in comparison with rival positions. The course will enable students to appreciate the interrelations between the different parts of Aristotle's thought, and to evaluate references to them in contexts other than this course (e.g. in the study of literature or politics).

CLAS 3901 EXTENDED ESSAY (0.5 unit)

This half unit is available to all final year students and is compulsory for all final year Ancient World students. It remains optional for final year Classics students.

It allows students the opportunity to embark on independent research on a topic of their choice, but normally on a subject related to one or more of the courses being taken by the candidate in the final year. After submitting a provisional title, students will be given support and guidance from an individual supervisor with whom they will meet regularly for discussion, but anyone considering this option should feel free to discuss possible areas of research with the Departmental Tutor or any member of the Department at an early stage in the academic year.

The essay should normally be between 4,000 and 6,000 words long, including footnotes and excluding bibliography.

After a general meeting organised by the Departmental Tutor in late October, a preliminary title must be submitted in writing by Friday 25 November 2011 to the Departmental Tutor for approval, after which an appropriate supervisor will be assigned. Students should arrange to meet their supervisors at the end of the first term for an initial discussion, which will be followed by regular meetings in term two. Final titles need to be submitted to the Departmental Tutor by Friday 27 January 2012. The final deadline for the essay itself is Friday 30 March.

CLAS 3902 YEAR-ABROAD DISSERTATION (1.0 unit)

The Year Abroad Dissertation is an essential part of the Year Abroad Study Programme and is a dissertation of 8,000–10,000 words on a subject related to one or more of the courses taken in the first or the second years at UCL or during the Year Abroad.

It is an essay of 8,000–10,000 words on a subject related to one or more of the courses taken in the first or the second years at UCL or during the Year Abroad. By 16 January 2012 a chosen theme must be agreed with and submitted to the Study Abroad Tutor at UCL, who will assign a supervisor at UCL. By 28 February, the exact title must be submitted to the Study Abroad Tutor at UCL. The dissertation itself must be submitted to the Departmental Office by Friday 14 September 2012.

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