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CCHH News & Events

Institute of Digital Health seminar

Humanoid robots as (indirect) tools for digital health in autism
Time: 20 February, 2:30–3:30pm
Place: Room G01, 66-72 Gower Street
Speaker: Alyssa Alcorn (CRAE) More...

Abortion in China

Thursday 9th Feb, 6–7pm, Room 802, Institute of EducationHealth Humanities Seminar. Speaker: Cong Yali 丛亚丽 (PKU), introduced by Vivienne Lo. More...

Dumplings 饺子 (2004)

Our New Year bonus film, by Hong Kong iconoclast director Fruit Chan 陈果, is 'a sinister story of diet, deception and death'.
Time: Wednesday 8 February, 7pm
Place: IAS Common GroundSouth Wing, Wilkins Building More...

Chinese film evening, 7/02/2017: In Love We Trust 左右 (2008)

Family drama In love we trust (aka Left Right), directed and scripted by Sixth Generation film maker Wang Xiaoshuai 王小帅, hinges on the conception of a 'saviour sibling' for a child diagnosed with leukaemia. The screening will be followed by a conversation between bioethicist Prof. Cong Yali 丛亚丽 (PKU) and philosopher and ethicist James Wilson (UCL) on the issues raised by the film. More...

The Doctor-Patient Relationship in Contemporary China

Tuesday 7 February, 2–4pm, IAS Room 19, South Wing, Wilkins Building. Speaker: Cong Yali 丛亚丽, Professor of Medical Ethics and Deputy Director of the Institute of Medical Humanities, PKU.
More...

CELEBRATE CHINESE NEW YEAR!

China Exchange 中国站 has a great programme of events to welcome in the Year of the Chicken. Highlights include a provocative 'short form debate evening' featuring CCHH's Vivienne Lo (Wed 1 Feb, 6.30pm) plus a documentary film-making challenge in partnership with London Documentary Network', plus a Silk and Bamboo 丝竹报春 concert with pipa virtuoso Chen Yu and flautist Liu Menglin... More...

Chinese film evening, 31/01/2017: For Fun 找乐 (1993)

The first film in 6th generation director Ning Ying's wryly humorous Beijing Trilogy, For Fun (Zhao le 找乐) tells the story of a group of retired Beijingers who set up a Peking Opera Group.  More...

Scholarships to study Chinese in China – deadline 13 Feb, 9am

Visit the UCL Global blog for details of the Chinese Government Scholarship scheme.
More...

David Dear

Self-cultivation and the formation of identity in Early Modern China

My research concerns the transmission and adoption of forms of Self-Cultivation and lifestyle regimen (YangSheng) in Ming and Qing China. The field of YangSheng and its conscious self cultivation is located at the nexus of the worlds of medicine, religion and ordinary daily life where individuals seek to negotiate their inner lives with the outer world of shared common reality. YangSheng activities range from choral singing and calligraphy to medicinal foods, meditation and martial arts. Anything, in short, which makes the practitioner feel better.  David Dear.jpg


Though functioning at many different level of intention, the concepts which underpin this, most notably the idea of the manipulation Qi, are widely accepted in China as given reality. But at the same time the practice is and always has been continuously reframed by a particular hegemonic discourse. Currently this largely revolves around the nature of "traditional Chinese culture" and just what it means to be Chinese.

My study is an inquiry into the reasons for the adoption of practice, the methods adopted, their adaptation from historical sources and the conditions which permit or hinder this, and the outcomes in terms of the effects on the individual's health, well-being, self image and on-going relationship with society at large. Particular areas of interest at the moment are the information contained in novels, stories and lifestyle guides or daily life encyclopaedias (RiYongLeiShu) of these era. I am further interested in the claims and uses made for the developing Martial Arts techniques of the 19 th and early 20 th centuries. My work has a strong multi-disciplinary approach, in particular combining anthropological approaches and insights, in order to illuminate texts that are often wilfully, or otherwise, obscure.

davidpdear@yahoo.com

Page last modified on 16 apr 11 22:28 by Helen Matthews