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Grand Challenges funding

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Grand Challenges logo

We are pleased to announce that the Centre for Low Countries Studies has been awarded Grand Challenges funding for our project:

Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies 38.2 (July 2014)

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Dutch Crossing : Journal of Low Countries Studies


The theme of immigration seems to be discussed on an almost daily basis in the British media at the moment. However, as we know, it is not a new phenomenon, but has been an almost permanent feature in the history of Britain. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, many thousands of people from the Low Countries were forced to leave home and seek a new life elsewhere. Given its geographical proximity it is not surprising that many of these refugees headed for Norfolk in eastern England. Large Dutch and French communities were established in Norwich; there was a smaller Dutch community, which lasted for some 100 years, in Great Yarmouth; and short-lived Dutch communities were established in King’s Lynn and Thetford. The locals referred to the migrants as Strangers, their arrival brought both opportunities and challenges. In the five papers in this edition of Dutch Crossing, various aspects of the history of the Dutch Strangers in Norfolk are considered.

ALCS Call for papers

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The 10th biennial conference of the Association for Low Countries Studies will be held from 10-12 September 2014 at University College London and the Dutch Centre in the City of London (Austin Friars). This year’s theme will be “Discord and Consensus” in a Low Countries context and original contributions are invited that interpret the conference theme in the broadest possible sense.

Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies 38.1 (March 2013)

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Dutch Crossing : Journal of Low Countries Studies

At the beginning of this first issue of 2014 let me draw your attention to the forthcoming tenth biennial conference of the Association for Low Countries Studies, which under the theme of Discord and Consensus will be held at University College London and the (new) Dutch Centre in the (old) Dutch Church at Austin Friars in the City of London,1 in September 2014. All countries, regions, and institutions are ultimately built on a degree of consensus, on a collective commitment to a concept, belief, or value system. This consensus is continuously rephrased and reinvented through a narrative of cohesion and challenged by expressions of discontent and discord. The history of the Low Countries is characterized by both a striving for consensus and eruptions of discord both internally or through outside challenges. In the centenary year of World War I (1914), which the Netherlands was lucky to be spared but Belgium and Luxembourg had to endure heavily, two centuries (and a bit) after the Battle of Waterloo and the reunification of the Low Countries in the Kingdom of the United Netherlands (1813–14), and three centuries after the Peace of Utrecht (1713), we thought this to be an appropriate theme for an interdisciplinary conference which aims to explore consensus and discord in a Low Countries context along and across broad cultural, linguistic, and historical lines, and interpret the conference theme in the broadest possible sense.

Collecting: Knowledge in Motion exhibition in UCL Octagon Gallery

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UCL Octagon Gallery

Over the last six months, Stefanie van Gemert and Ulrich Tiedau from UCL Dutch worked together with Margot Finn and Kate Smith (History) and Claire Dwyer (Geography) to develop a new exhibition, Collecting: Knowledge in Motion. The display explores stasis and movement of objects in UCL’s collections. Knowledge in Motion will open on Wednesday, 22 January 2014, in UCL’s Octagon Gallery, and you are warmly invited to come and have a look.

Travelling and Translation: Abdelkader Benali (31 January 2014)

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Abdelkader Benali

Students, alumni and friends of the UCL Dutch department are warmly invited to a talk and wine reception organised by the UCL Centre for Low Countries Studies.

Amsterdam Style City : Symposium at V&A Museum, 1 Feb 2014

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Style City Amsterdam at Victoria & Albert Museum February 2014

On 1st February 2014, it will be Amsterdam’s turn to feature as a ‘Style City’. This half-day symposium is part of a lecture series organised of the Victoria and Albert Museum. The afternoon consists of three separate presentations covering ‘Canals and Houses’, ‘Amsterdam Art and Artists’ and as well as the ‘The Representation of Amsterdam in Contemporary Film and Literature’.

Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies 37.3 (November 2013)

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Dutch Crossing : Journal of Low Countries Studies

At the beginning of this last issue before the cut-off date for the REF2014, the British Research Excellence Framework, a few words on the utility and futility of bibliometric indicators as quality measurements of scholarly publication. Regular readers will know that Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies since 2011 is indexed in all important citation and indexing services, including the ‘big two’, the Arts & Humanities Citation Index (AHCI), part of ISI Thomson-Reuters’s Web of Science, and Elsevier’s Scopus database, and has received and INT1-rating, the highest category, on the History list of the controversial European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH).

New Monograph by Jane Fenoulhet on Cees Nooteboom and his Writing

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Jane Fenoulhet, Nomadic Literature: Cees Nooteboom and his writing

Cees Nooteboom (born 1933) is a writer of fiction, poetry and travel literature. Translated into at least thirty-four languages, his work raises important questions about the mobility of literary texts and invites a new theoretical approach, for to read Nooteboom straightforwardly as a Dutch author would be to do him an injustice.

London Low Countries History – Research Seminar Series 2013/14

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Leo Belgicus
Convenors: Anne Goldgar (KCL), Ben Kaplan (UCL), Ulrich Tiedau (UCL)

The Low Countries history research seminars meet on Friday afternoons in the Institute of Historical Research at 5:15 pm. Please note: due to refurbishment work at the IHR, seminars this year meet in alternative locations – see schedule – and 15 mins later than previously.  SH Athlone = Senate House, Athlone Room, located in the South Block on the 1st floor, room 102.  SH Bedford = Senate House, Bedford Room, South Block on the ground floor, room G37.  STB 9 = Stewart House, adjacent to Senate House, at 32 Russell Square, room 9 in the basement.

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