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CDB Seminars
All welcome

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All Seminars are held in the Gavin De Beer Lecture Theatre, Anatomy Building, Thursday 1-2pm (unless otherwise stated)

Thursday 9 July: midday-2.40pm

Host: Yoshiyuki Yamamoto

Room 249, 2nd Floor, Medical Sciences Building, Gower Street

12.00pm  Heather Steele-Stallard: “Human iPS cell-based platforms for disease modelling and therapy screening for laminopathies”
12.15pm  Terry Felton: “Regulation of asymmetric neurogenesis in C. elegans
12.30pm  Marcus Ghosh: “Assigning Behavioural and Neurodevelopmental Functions to Autism-associated Genes”
12.45pm  Giulia Ferrari: “Towards a genomic integration-free, iPS cell and human artificial chromosome-based therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy”
1.00pm  Michele Sammut: “Mystery cells in C.elegans: Sex, Glia transdifferation and Learning”
1.15pm  Johanna Buchler: "The Wnt co-receptor LRP6 and synapse regulation".
1.30pm  

Interval
1.40pm  Renato Martinho: “The Asymmetric Habenula of Zebrafish: from Transcriptome to Behaviour”
1.55pm  Alex Fedorec: “Plasmid persistence: balancing plasmid stability and host competitiveness”
2.10pm  Maryam Khosravi: "Investigating novel genetic associations with ciliopathy in the zebrafish"
2.25pm  Marc Williams: “Identification of neutral tumour evolution across cancer types”

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Dr Yoshiyuki Yamamoto

Research Interests

Research in our lab focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of morphological novelties during evolution. We are using the Mexican tetra Astyanax mexicanus as a model system for studying evolution, development and regeneration.

Yamamoto Lab Figures
Evolution, development and regeneration

Astyanax mexicanus exhibits both eyed surface (surface fish: Figure 1) and eyeless cave (cavefish: figure 2) populations. During the late Pleistocene (about 10,000 to 100,000 years ago), the surface fish diverged into at least 30 distinct cavefish populations in northern Mexico. Since then, the cavefish have evolved regressive characters such as degenerate eyes, a smaller optic tectum, and less pigment, but they also have evolved constructive characteristics such as a larger jaw and additional teeth, cranial neuromasts, and taste buds. We use molecular and experimental embryological techniques to study the mechanisms by which this evolution occurred. Our research mainly focuses on the following projects:

· Mechanisms and evolutionary forces of cavefish eye degeneration

· Brain evolution

· Craniofacial development and evolution

· Heart development and regeneration

If you are interested in participating in these research projects, feel free to contact us, e-mail: yoshiyuki.yamamoto@ucl.ac.uk

Lab members
Yamamoto Lab Members 2013

· Yoshiyuki Yamamoto E-mail: yoshiyuki.yamamoto@ucl.ac.uk

· Mathilda Mommersteeg (Postdoctoral Research Fellow): m.mommersteeg@ucl.ac.uk

· Fábio Rodrigues (Student)

· Amy Munro-Faure (Student)

· Jake Wyatt (Student)

Contact

Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

University College London

Gower Street

London WC1E 6BT

UK

Publications and further information

Page last modified on 31 jul 13 14:54 by Edward D Whitfield