A A A

CDB Seminars
All welcome

__

All Seminars are held in the Gavin De Beer Lecture Theatre, Anatomy Building, Thursday 1-2pm

11 Dec: Marcus Ghosh (Rihel lab)/ (Chubbs lab)

_____________________



See all seminars

Find us on Facebook

Prof Roberto Mayor

Dr Roberto Mayor

Prof Roberto Mayor is a Professor of Developmental and Cellular Neurobiology

He was named International Scholar of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). He is a member of the editorial board of Development and Developmental Dynamics and Associate Editor of the International Journal of Developmental Biology. He was founder and president of the Latin American Society of Developmental Biology (LASDB)

Telephone: 020 7679 3323, (Int: 33323)

r.mayor@ucl.ac.uk

Research Lab website

The primary aim of our research group is to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the development of the Neural Crest.

We would like to know how Neural Crest cells acquire their identity within the ectoderm and how their migration and differentiation is controlled.

The Neural Crest is a group of cells found in all vertebrate embryos. It forms in the neural folds at the border of the neural plate and gives rise to the Peripheral Nervous System,   as well as the cartilage, bone and muscle in the face and neck, pigmented cells in the skin, several endocrine glands and part of the heart. It is this extraordinary ability of the Neural Crest to become many different types of cell that has attracted the attention of many biologists. The second astonishing characteristic of neural crest cells is that they are able to migrate very long distances in the embryo. The neural crest has been called the “explorer of the embryo” as it is one of the embryonic cell types that migrate most during development, eventually colonizing almost every tissue.

The primary aim of our research group is to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the development of the Neural Crest. We would like to know how Neural Crest cells acquire their identity within the ectoderm and how their migration and differentiation is controlled. We study neural crest development in zebrafish and frog ( Xenopus laevis) embryos as these two animal models offer several complementary advantages.

Selected Publications:

Theveneau E, Steventon B, Scarpa E, Garcia S, Trepat X, Streit A, Mayor R. (2013). Chase-and-run between adjacent cell populations promotes directional collective migration. Nature Cell Biology. 15, 763-72 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23770678

Barriga EH, Maxwell PH, Reyes AE, Mayor R. 92013). The hypoxia factor Hif-1α controls neural crest chemotaxis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. J Cell Biol. 201, 759-76. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23712262

Carmona-Fontaine C, Theveneau E, Tzekou A, Tada M, Woods M, Page KM, Parsons M, Lambris JD, Mayor R. (2011). Complement fragment C3a controls mutual cell attraction during collective cell migration. Developmental Cell. 21, 1026-37. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22118769

Theveneau E, Marchant L, Kuriyama S, Gull M, Moepps B, Parsons M, Mayor R. Collective chemotaxis requires contact-dependent cell polarity. Developmental Cell. 2010 Jul 20;19(1):39-53. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20643349

Carmona-Fontaine C, Matthews HK, Kuriyama S, Moreno M, Dunn GA, Parsons M, Stern CD, Mayor R. Contact inhibition of locomotion in vivo controls neural crest directional migration. Nature. 2008 Dec 18;456(7224):957-61. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19078960

IRIS


Page last modified on 26 sep 14 12:41 by Edward D Whitfield