Archive of Latest Brain Sciences News

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RNA build-up linked to dementia and motor neuron disease

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Quad in Autumn

A new toxic entity associated with genetically inherited forms of dementia and motor neuron disease has been identified by scientists at the UCL Institute of Neurology.

Reindeers' eyes change colour with Arctic seasons

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Reindeer eye

The eyes of Arctic reindeer change colour through the seasons from gold to blue, adapting to extreme changes of light levels in their environment and helping detect predators.

Striking research images sought for UCL competition

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Twitter languages of London

Does your research produce images that have aesthetic and artistic appeal? If so, consider entering the annual ‘Research Images as Art / Art Images as Research’ competition and exhibition.

UCLPartners Academic Health Science Centre video

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UCLPartners have produced a short film in which the leaders of our Academic Health Science Centre (AHSC) discuss strengths and successes.

Smart neurons: single dendrites can perform computations

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Dendrite

When you look at the hands of a clock or the streets on a map, your brain is effortlessly performing computations that tell you about the orientation of these objects. New research by UCL scientists has shown that these computations can be carried out by the microscopic branches of neurons known as dendrites, which are the receiving elements of neurons.

Alan Thompson discusses Atlas of MS on Lancet News

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Professor Alan Thompson was interviewed today regarding the Atlas of Multiple Sclerosis; a database coordinated by the MS International Federation.

A slow, loving, 'affective' touch may be key to a healthy sense of self

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Quad in Autumn

A loving touch, characterised by a slow caress or stroke - often an instinctive gesture from a mother to a child or between partners in romantic relationships – may increase the brain's ability to construct a sense of body ownership and, in turn, play a part in creating and sustaining a healthy sense of self.

Why blame feels so hard to take

Publication date:

Quad in Autumn

When something we do produces a positive result, we actually perceive it differently than we would if that same action yielded a negative result. In particular, people feel a greater connection between voluntary actions and their outcomes if those outcomes are good than if they are bad. The discovery, reported in the journal Current Biology, yields important insight into notions about personal responsibility.

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