Course Descriptions, 2014-15

First Year

Second Year

Third Year


FIRST-YEAR COURSES

HART1001 History of Art and its Objects (The Core Course) [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Mechthild Fend (Autumn) Stephanie Schwartz (Spring)
Timetabled:
Autumn and Spring Terms on Fridays 14.00-17.00.
This is an obligatory introductory course for all History of Art students and is not normally available to students from outside the department. The course is an introduction to a range of skills required to study the History of Art, including the first-hand study of works of art. It is designed to familiarise students with some current debates in the subject, and introduce them to a variety of theoretical positions of which they need to be aware in the course of their degree.

Student Contact Hours: 40, in 20 weekly 1-hour lectures and 20 1-hour seminars.
Duration of Course:
20+ weeks, beginning in first week of Autumn term.
Student Workload:
Reading and other preparation for weekly classes, three pieces of written work and an oral presentation (notes submitted).
Means of Assessment: 3 assessed essays (1500-2000 words each) and 1 oral/presentation task (each element 25% of the overall mark).
Prerequisites: Students should normally be in the first year of a Single or Combined Honours degree in History of Art.

HART1306 History of European Art (1): Classical to Early Renaissance [0.5 cu]
 (Autumn)

HART1305 History of European Art (2): High Renaissance to the Present Day [0.5 cu] (Spring)

Course tutors: Alison Wright (Autumn) and Rose Marie San Juan (Spring)
Timetabled:
HART1306 Autumn Term; HART1305 Spring Term; Wednesdays, 09.00-11.00.
These are obligatory introductory courses for all History of Art students but they are also available to students from outside the department. In ten lectures each term students are introduced to the dominant narrative of art history as an historical development ('the canon'), and are encouraged to look at that model critically. The subject matter of the lecture series ranges from classical to contemporary art. Space is also given to categories outside the conventional canon.
Student Contact Hours: Lectures and question time: 20 hours for each course.
Duration of  Course: 10+ weeks, the first course begins in first week of Autumn term, the second in the first week of the Spring term.
Student Workload: Attendance at all lectures, reading in support of lectures, exam.
Means of Assessment: 100% by unseen examination in Summer Term.
Prerequisites: Students should normally be in the first year of a Single or Combined Honours degree in History of Art.


HART1304 Thematic Seminar (1): Art and Architecture pre 1700 [0.5 cu]

Overall course tutor: Maria Loh
Timetabled:
Autumn and Spring Terms: Thursdays 11.00-13.00, or at other time by arrangement.
This course is designed specifically for students on the first-year Single Honours History of Art, or History of Art with Material Studies, or any of the Combined Honours  with History of Art programmes. It comprises a number of historical and topical seminar options which may be taught in either of the two terms. These options are designed to provide students with smaller group teaching and direct engagement with art objects in museums, galleries and historical sites. Students take one out of the several options on offer during the academic year, and may also take one from HART1307. The course is taught as a mixture of informal lectures, seminars and/or gallery visits, accompanied by weekly reading projects and group discussion of key issues.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student Workload: Attendance at all classes, back-up reading, 2 essays.
Means of Assessment: Two essays, one 1500-2000 words weighted at 40% submitted before Reading Week, the other 2500-3000 words weighted at 60% submitted by the end of term.
Prerequisites:
Appropriate background in history or art history.

For a full list of Thematic Seminars offered this year please follow the link from HART 1307 below.


HART1307 Thematic Seminar (2): Art and Architecture after 1700 [0.5 cu]

Overall Course tutor: Maria Loh
Timetabled:
Autumn and Spring Terms: Thursdays 11.00-13.00, or at other time by arrangement.
This course is designed specifically for students on the first-year Single Honours History of Art, or History of Art with Material Studies, or any of the Combined Honours  with History of Art programmes. It comprises a number of historical and topical seminar options which may be taught in either of the two terms. These options are designed to provide students with smaller group teaching and direct engagement with art objects in museums, galleries and historical sites. Students take one out of several options on offer during the academic year, and may also take one from HART1304. The course is taught as a mixture of informal lectures, seminars and/or gallery visits, accompanied by weekly reading projects and group discussion of key issues.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student Workload: Attendance at all classes, back-up reading, 2 essays.
Means of Assessment: Two essays, one 1500-2000 words weighted at 40% submitted before Reading Week, the other 2500-3000 words weighted at 60% submitted by the end of term.
Prerequisites:
Appropriate background in history or art history.

Thematic Seminars offered this year


HART1302 Methods and Materials I [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Emma Richardson
Timetabled
: Spring Term; Tuesdays 11.00-13.00

This course will present an overview of the major classes of materials found within museum collections, and address their application as artists materials.Discussion will be given to the types of physical properties that different materials exhibit, so that the student might begin to understand why an artist may have used a certain material.

The class will be taken on two site visits, the first to The British Museum to initiate a dialogue regarding the many materials present in collections, and to start to think of how each material may have been applied. The second site visit will be to an artist’s studio, placing the student within the artist’s environment. This course will provide the student with the theoretical and practical aspects of artist’s techniques and equipment, and giving an insight into the artist’s studio.

Duration of Course: 10 weeks, beginning in 1st week of Autumn term.
Student Contact Hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Attendance at all classes, prescribed and back-up reading, practical work, one short written task, possibly one short presentation, and one assessed essay.
Means of Assessment: 40% by course-essay (c. 2000 words), 60% by unseen exam (2 hours).
Prerequisites: Normally only offered to 1st-year HAMS students.


HART1303 Science for Art Historians [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Rosemary Grayburn
Timetabled:
Autumn Term; Tuesdays 11.00-13.00

The course will lay a scientific foundation for understanding the relationship between the composition of artefacts, physical properties, and application. The first part of the course will cover topics such as the periodic table, solubility, pH, and colour chemistry. Whilst the emphasis of the later part of the course will be on organic polymers, we will begin with a review of basic organic and inorganic chemistry, setting up a deeper understanding of the issues surrounding materials, such as deterioration mechanisms.
Duration of course: 10 weeks, beginning in the first week of the Spring term.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours.
Student Workload:
Attendance at all classes, prescribed and back-up reading, lab work, essay
Means of Assessment: 20% written-up lab work, 20% essay (c. 2000 words), 60% by unseen exam (2 hours).
Prerequisites: Normally only offered to 1st-year HAMS students.



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SECOND-YEAR COURSES
(All courses are half-unit courses taught in one term. Note that the courses are arranged with the autumn term options followed by the spring term options)

AUTUMN TERM COURSES

HART2001 History of the Category Art [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Charles Ford and TJ Demos
Timetabled
: Autumn Term; Tuesdays 11.00-13.00.
This course aims to familiarise students with the way in which the concept of art has evolved in the European world, especially since the Renaissance. It examines the emergence of Aesthetics as a distinct branch of philosophy in the eighteenth century, and subsequent developments, especially in relation to the role of the category Art in Modernism. It is based on the study of texts in Seminars.

Duration of course: 10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours: 20 hours, a mixture of lectures and text-based discussion classes.
Student Workload: Attendance at all classes, prescribed and back-up reading, two pieces of written work.
Means of Assessment
: Two essays: a short Response Paper (1350-1500 words due around Reading Week weighted at 40%); a second essay (2000-2500 words due the last day of class weighted at 60%).
Prerequisites: Normally only offered to 2nd-year History of Art students. Other closely similar experience might be acceptable.

HART2217 Theory and History of Conservation [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Emma Richardson
Timetabled
: Autumn Term; Mondays 11.00–13.00.
This course is designed specifically for HAMS students. It comprises field trips to the V&A, The National Gallery, Tate Modern, and Whitechapel Gallery with the consideration of the intellectual framework within which contemporary conservation practices need to be established: It focuses on the history of the profession, on related institutions, and on issues of materiality and replication since the long nineteenth century. Which politics are attached to conservation? How could ephemeral artworks be preserved? And do we really need to embalm everything? How about the punk slogan "search and destroy"?
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Attendance at all classes, prescribed and back-up reading, two pieces of written work.
Means of Assessment: 2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2010 GATEWAY COURSE: After Life: Art, Knowledge and Observation in Early Modern Europe [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Mechthild Fend
Timetabled: Autumn term; Mondays 14.00–16.00.

This lecture course will engage with the question of what and how draughtsmen, print makers, painters and artisans know, and will discuss the role of images in the production and circulation of knowledge. It will introduce students to practices of artistic anatomy, and the participation of artists in the production of anatomical atlases from the sixteenth century onwards. It will look at early modern artistic training, and in particular the formation of observational and drawing skills in the practice of drawing from the life model in the art academies. We will problematise concepts such as ‘after life’ and ‘truth to nature’ and discuss how artists or the naturalists themselves negotiate observation, knowledge (e.g. of the laws of perspective) and imagination when visualising phenomena such as the surface of the moon, the human skeleton, the eye of a fly, the microscopic structure of plants or the colour of skin. The course focuses on the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and will address examples from France, England, Italy and the Netherlands.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, one essay and exam.
Means of Assessment: 50% by essay (2000-2500 words), 50% by unseen 2 hour examination.
Prerequisites:
Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2231 Aesthetics and Politics [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: TJ Demos
Timetabled:
Autumn Term; Wednesdays 11.00-13.00

Further course details to follow
Duration of Course: 
10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, class presentation, and exam.
Means of Assessment:
2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: 
Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2222 Art/Event [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Cadence Kinsey
Timetabled:
Autumn Term; Mondays 11.00-13.00
This course traces the emergence of art works with an ‘event structure’, from Dada and Futurist theatre to Relational Aesthetics, with an emphasis on subversive practices intended to critique the structures of art production and display and/or everyday life. Against the object-based character of formalist aesthetics, and using non-traditional techniques and technologies, the ‘event’ challenges the borders of art and non-art. The ‘event’ is not theatre or performance either, so what is it? We will explore art historical (S. C. Foster, H Rosenberg) and political and philosophical (Sartre, Badiou) concepts of the event alongside its practical iterations through Action Painting, Fluxus, Viennese Actionism, Body Art and contemporary practices.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student contact hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, contribution to class discussion, and exam.
Means of assessment: 2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2221 Design in the Italian Renaissance 1400-1520 [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Alison Wright
Timetabled:
Autumn Term; Wednesdays 11.00-13.00

The course offers an overview of Italian design practice and its dramatic developments in the fifteenth-century in Italy. The class will study choices and changes in representation from a variety of perspectives relating firstly to the nature of artistic tasks, including goldsmith work and textiles as well as painting or sculpture, and secondly to the development of drawing and design processes in the hands of artists working across professional categories and patronage traditions like Pisanello and Leonardo. Students will gain familiarity with the increasingly diverse range of drawing functions and techniques as well as print media as these began to provide new spaces of invention and potential markets for design. The course offers the opportunity to study works on paper and sculpted designs at first hand in London collections.
Duration of Course:  
10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours: 
20+ hours (10 two-hour classes, and 3 perambulations around London).
Student Workload:
 Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, class presentation, and exam.
Means of Assessment:
2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:  
Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2239  History and Technology of Textiles[0.5 cu]

Course Tutor: Emma Richardson
Timetabled:
Autumn Term: Wednesdays 11.00–13.00.

This course will combine both theoretical and practical approaches to the understanding of textiles, their properties and their application as artistic media. By examining the history and development of textile, we will begin to map their usage through the centuries to the present day, and their application within art and design. We will explore the physical properties of fibres, yarns and textiles, investigate the implications for fabrication, and understand what impact this has on their visual nature.

In addition to seminars and lectures, the course will include guest speakers, and object based learning at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Additionally, practical sessions, where the student will study the structure of fibres under the microscope, as well as extrude synthetic fibres, will provide an appreciation for materiality and help interpret textile artworks of various construction.
Duration of Course:
10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, class presentation, and exam.
Means of Assessment:
2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant academic experience.

HART2107 Selected Themes in Art and Architecture c.1700 Onwards (1) Machines, Media and Meaning: Photography to the Internet [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Cadence Kinsey
Timetabled:
Autumn Term; Thursdays 11.00-13.00

This course will look at the history of technology in art, beginning with the development of photography, moving through film and video, to the emergence of digital media and internet art. This course will be framed by the theoretical work of Martin Heidegger on technology, and his concept of techne as a challenge to the instrumentalising objectivity presupposed by traditional models. We will look at core issues related to technology in art including: theories of production and re-production and the pressure this puts on the category ‘art’; artist film and haptic vision; the rise of the amateur and home-video in the 1970s; the intersections between performance and technology; questions of visual epistemology (the ‘real’ and the ‘virtual’); the crossover between art and medicine in the 1990s; and ‘post-internet’ art and the self-image.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student contact hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, contribution to class discussion, and exam.
Means of assessment: 2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2108 Photographic Self [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Sarah James
Timetabled:
Autumn Term; Thursdays 11.00-13.00

This course offers an introduction to photographic portraiture and the ways in which photography has impacted upon questions of subjectivity, identity and agency. The course will engage with the major theoretical and philosophical works on photography and photographic culture in this period, considering a range of intriguing and complex issues surrounding questions of likeness, interiority and exteriority, class consciousness, physiognomy, the archive, surveillance, race, ethnicity, post-colonialism, gender, sexuality, and performativity. We will explore the history of portrait photographs - from the invention of photography to the present day - and a wide range of other kinds of photographic portraits from the fields of anthropology, science, medicine and psychiatry  in relation to the formation of modern subjectivity, through to the breakdown of essentialist views of personal identity and the authority of naturalistic portraiture.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student contact hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, contribution to class discussion, and exam.
Means of assessment: 2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2206 Modernism and the European Avant-Gardes [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Sarah James
Timetabled:
Autumn Term; Fridays 11.00-13.00

This course will examine the European avant-garde - including the Italian Futurists, Soviet Constructivists, Dadaists, the Bauhaus and New Objectivity in Germany, and Surrealists in France - in relation to technology and mass culture. We'll consider artistic production in relation to photography, mechanical reproduction, cinema, advertising, consumerism, and life in the modern metropolis. We will explore the historical avant-garde's transformation of traditional artistic practices, and their often utopian ambitions, in relation to art's radical engagement with new technologies, politics and mass and popular culture. We'll examine the ways in which artists drew on technologies, mass media and popular culture to celebrate and critique modernity and problematise traditional approaches to artistic production, subjective experience, gender norms, and bourgeois culture more generally. We'll also consider how the avant-garde's artistic strategies and utopian goals were distorted and destroyed by the emergence of fascism and Stalinism, and ask whether any of it's utopian aims can be seen as re-emerging in the postwar period.

* Students who have already completed the Gateway HART 2011: Modernity Through the Lens may not take this course.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student contact hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, contribution to class discussion, and exam.
Means of assessment: 2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.



SPRING TERM COURSES


HART2002 Methodologies of Art History [0.5 cu]

Course tutors: Tamar Garb and Rose Marie San Juan
Timetabled: Spring Term: Tuesdays 11.00-13.00.
This text-based course introduces students to a variety of different methodologies and approaches current in the discipline. Through lectures, seminars and weekly reading tasks students learn to identify and evaluate different kinds of art historical writing. Topics addressed normally include: formalist positions in modernist criticism, iconography, the social history of art, theories of ideology, semiotics, discourse theory, psycho-analytic approaches, issues of gender, sexuality and subjectivity, post-colonial theory and race and ethnicity.
Duration of course:
10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20 hours, a mixture of lectures and text-based discussion classes.
Student Workload:
Attendance at all classes, prescribed and back-up reading, two pieces of written work.
Means of Assessment:
Two essays: a short Response Paper (c. 1500 words due around Reading Week weighted at 40%); a second essay (2000-2500 words due the last day of class weighted at 60%).

Prerequisites: Normally only offered to 2nd-year History of Art students. Other closely similar experience might be acceptable.

HART2005 Methodologies of Making [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll
Timetabled: Spring Term; Thursday 16.00-18.00

This text-based course introduces the "experimental system" (Rheinberger) of art production, curating, or care and conservation: theories connected to the producers, spaces of making and doing, tools, materiality, things, economics, installation, or the workings of art institutions, e g the fields that determine what could be called the practices of art history. The first part of each session will introduce a close reading of the texts under consideration, combined with group discussion. The second part will apply these theories to one exemplary case study of art production, curating, or conservation across the centuries. How is theory performed? How is it entangled with practice? How to theorise practice or to develop a practial aesthetic?
Duration of course
: 10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours.
Student Workload:
Attendance at all classes, prescribed and back-up reading, two pieces of written work.
Means of Assessment: Two essays: a short Response Paper (c. 1500 words due towards the end of term weighted at 40%); a second essay (2000-2500 words due at the beginning of the Exam term weighted at 60%).
Prerequisites: Normally only offered to 2nd-year History of Art students. Other closely similar experience might be acceptable.

HART2238 (HAMS only) Methods and Materials II [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Emma Richardson
Timetabled:
Spring Term; Thursdays 11.00-13.00
This course will expand on, and extend, the materials and methodologies covered during the first year’s course, presenting an overview of the major classes of materials found within museum collections, and addressing their application as artist’s materials. In this second course, focus will be given to the more obscure materials found in works of art, for example wax, synthetic resins, and foam. Discussion will be given to the types of physical properties that different materials exhibit, so that the student might begin to understand why an artist may have used a certain material.
This course will provide the student with the theoretical and practical aspects of artist’s techniques and application, and highlight some of the issues surrounding their preservation and conservation.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student contact hours: 20+ hours in 10 weekly 2-hour classes, plus supervised lab/project work.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, preparation for classes, independent project work.
Means of assessment: 2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed the first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2011 GATEWAY COURSE: Image/Object [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Briony Fer
Timetabled:
Spring Term; Mondays 14.00-16.00

This course looks at developments in modern art  during the twentieth century and up to the present. What was at stake in competing visions of what the modern meant? How has modern art come to look as it does? What critical function might it have as it has moved away from depicting objects in the world? In order to answer such questions, the course focuses on thematic topics that have been persistent within modernism. Beginning with the role of collage, we examine the fragmentation of the image in relation to questions of modernism and modernity. The crisis of representation brought about in cubism had powerful ramifications for the status and meaning of the art object, especially as it was interpreted in Dada and Surrealism. We look at the crisis of the object and the subsequent histories of the ready-made; the role of photography as a challenge to easel painting; early European abstraction and utopian visions of modernity; the theory of the avant-garde; post-war American abstraction and its relation to modernist criticism; art and commodity culture in the 1960s; the disintegration of modernism and the redefinition of sculpture; the body as a site of art production and other aspects of contemporary art.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student contact hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, one essay, and exam.
Means of assessment: 50% by essay (2000-2500 words), 50% by unseen 2 hour examination.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2202 London and Paris, c. 1700 - c. 1850 [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Susannah Walker
Timetabled:
Spring Term; Wednesdays 11.00-13.00
The course deals with the development of London and Paris as sites of visual fascination through their architecture, sculpture and the emergence of the public art exhibition alongside alternative sites of urban spectacle including: the theatrical performances,  public executions, military parades and spaces of consumption.
The course will consider mediation of London and Paris through literature, costume, print culture and cartography. Material will be viewed through the conceptual frameworks of the spectacle, "modernity", the city as politically contested space, the official urban plan and its "underworlds", the commodity fetish and the translation of alternative sensory approaches to the city (scent/ touch/ sound) to its visual image.
Duration of Course: 
10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours (10 two-hour classes, and 3 perambulations around London).
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, class presentation, and exam.
Means of Assessment:
2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: 
Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2101 Selected Themes in Medieval Art and Architecture: Medieval Maps: Knowledge, Imagination, and The World [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Jack Hartnell
Timetabled:
Spring Term; Tuesdays 14.00-16.00

Maps help us to conceive of abstract concepts in tangible visual form. Be it geographical notions of the globe or the heavens, or perhaps more complex outlines of the body, the mind, time, or even history, a map helps to bound and give features to otherwise inexplicable space and knowledge. This course uses these cartographic ideas as a starting point for understanding the visual, intellectual, and imaginative cultures of the Middle Ages. Each week we will consider a different realm of the medieval world through its maps and diagrams: the earth and the stars, the city and the body, the past and the present, and the other and the self. Today, maps help us to conceive of and give voice to the world around us. Not only do we rely on their accuracy to chart the detail of our daily lives, but they also come layered with all sorts of complex information: names, places, events, routes, timings, coordinates, colours. This course suggests that the same is true of maps in the Middle Ages, and that we might be able to pick through their subtle veneers of time and place to expose the exciting and complex conception of the world at the time of their creation.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student contact hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, contribution to class discussion, and exam.
Means of assessment: 2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2214 Architecture and Modernity: Urban Spaces - Urban Living [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Eva Branscombe
Timetabled:
Spring; Mondays 16.00-18.00

The aim of the course is to investigate and discuss London as a place of mass residence that through the ages has been able to develop and adapt to different social needs and conditions. The investigations will be conducted in the form of a broader urban reading of London as a contemporary global city, but the emphasis will also be on cross-cultural and interdisciplinary influences that have helped over time to shape, change and reinterpret the various requirements for human habitation and domesticity within the urban environment. Hence the key issues to be considered include those of representation, identity, politics and society and gender relations juxtaposed to the human condition and its basic need for shelter.

The class will be investigating and learning about architecture from the C18 to the present. Different buildings will be investigated from the palace to the private urban house and the hotel (the home away from home), to the large scale modern housing estates. All of these buildings must be understood as responding to the changing urban condition. While the course is mostly classroom based many buildings that form part of the discussion can be visited independently in London.
Duration of Course: 
10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, class presentation, and exam.
Means of Assessment:
2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: 
Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2208 Making, Exchanging and Evaluating Art in Europe c. 1500 - c. 1700 [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Charles Ford
Timetabled:
Spring Term; Mondays 11.00-13.00
The course explores the material culture of making, distributing and exchanging works of art, and the intellectual cultures informing the definition of artists’ careers and the evaluation of their products. We will have classes covering: art writers and 'art theory'; artists' training (workshop and academy); biographies and careers (ideal and typical); books, prints and printmaking; the marketing of art; Palladio and the career of the professional architect; Caravaggio and contemporary reputation.
Duration of Course: 
10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours (10 two-hour classes, including a Gallery Visit).
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, class presentation, and exam.
Means of Assessment:
2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: 
Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2105 Selected Themes in Art and Architecture c.1700-c.1850: (Re)viewing Romanticism [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Susannah Walker
Timetabled:
Spring Term; Fridays 11.00-13.00

"Romanticism" is both a term and a position that students of art history are often warned to steer away from. Seemingly anachronistic and associated with misleading myths of "creativity" and "genius"; Romanticism has often seemed like the wall that critical analysis must dismantle.

But Romanticism was a pivotal and historically  defined cultural movement which was constructed in the first decades of the nineteenth century through a nexus of fictional and factual texts, musical and theatrical performances and with its own specific visual languages. Furthermore, the interface between art objects termed "Romantic" and popular culture,  Romanticism's construction of the artist as celebrity and its positioning in opposition to a rival aesthetic code (Classicism) informs the ways in which art is received and understood in the present. Therefore, this course will critically analyze the idea of Romanticism and its impact.

 Seminars will focus on its eighteenth century origins, its key exponents and their rivals in the early decades of the nineteenth century, its politics, Romantic representations of gender identity, sexuality and the body, its audiences and its subsequent impact on artistic personae from the Pre-Raphaelites to the Symbolists to the "New Romantics" of our own era.
Duration of Course: 
10 weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, class presentation, and exam.
Means of Assessment:
2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: 
Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.

HART2106 Selected Themes in Art and Architecture c.1700 Onwards (2): The Italian Avant-Garde [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Teresa Kittler
Timetabled:
Spring Term; Thursdays 14.00-16.00

This course explores key developments in the Italian avant-garde beginning with Futurism and ending with the experimental practices of the 1960s and early 1970s. Through an examination of the key theoretical debates that surround the historicisation of the avant-garde, we will consider what constituted avant-garde practices and explore their contested status in Italy throughout the twentieth century. Focusing on specific art historical movements, key figures and regional centres and following a chronological order, we begin by considering the challenges to traditional accounts of modernist aesthetics posed by Futurist experimental practice. We will go on to look at the legacy of futurism within broader debates between Italy’s historical past and contemporary practice, art and design. Foregrounding the question of media and materiality, this course will examine a diverse body of works alongside key exhibitions and art critical writings in order to explore the Italian avant-garde through a number of key issues such as its relationship to traditional accounts of modernist aesthetics; progressivist politics throughout the twentieth century, questions of the individual versus collective forms of making art, technology, consumer culture and Italy’s relationship to international artistic practices.
Duration of Course: 10 weeks.
Student contact hours: 20+ hours.
Student Workload: Prescribed and back-up reading, private gallery visits, one essay, contribution to class discussion, and exam.
Means of assessment: 2000-2,500 word essay weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and 2 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Students should have completed a first-year Art History programme or have equivalent relevant experience.



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FINAL/THIRD-YEAR COURSES
(Note that the Special Subject courses are arranged in 'historical' order;  the essay options are set out first. All Special Subject courses are of one unit and are taught over both terms.)


FINAL YEAR ESSAY OPTIONS

HART3904 Undergraduate report [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Fred Schwartz
A c. 10,000 word essay to be handed in at the beginning of the Summer term. Students define a research project with the help and approval of the Department and receive guidance while undertaking the research and writing the essay.


HART3906 Independent Study Essay in History of Art [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Fred Schwartz
A c. 5,000 word essay to be handed in normally at the beginning of the Spring term. This half-unit is designed to enable students to present an essay for assessment in connection with their own private studies or with a period of time spent auditing and contributing to a third-stage Special Subject course.



HART3907 History of Art and Material Studies Project Paper [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Fred Schwartz
A c. 10,000 word essay to be handed in at the beginning of the Summer term. Students define a History of Art and Material Studies research project with the help and approval of the Department and receive guidance while undertaking the research and writing the essay.

HART3230 Art/Work/Spaces [0.5 cu]

Course tutor: Emma Richardson
Timetabled:
By arrangement between tutor, participating institutions and students.
This is a half-unit work/experience placement in the art trade, a museum or gallery, or a conservation studio. Available only to HAMS students.
Duration of Course: 10 + weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
20+ hours.
Student Workload:
Students carry out a work/experience placement and write up an essay on a topic relating to that experience.
Means of Assessment: c. 5000 word essay
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year HAMS course.


FINAL YEAR SPECIAL SUBJECT COURSES

HART3223 Tears of Eros [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Maria Loh
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Tuesdays 11.00-13.00.
The art of painting was invented by a lovesick teenage girl.  In the Natural History of Pliny the Elder, we hear how, in a bout of advanced melancholia, the daughter of Butades, the potter of Corinth, traced her lover’s shadow upon a wall by the lonely light of a candle as he slept.  In this manner, she crafted a memento that enabled her to keep him beneath her eyes and close to her heart knowing well that he would eventually be gone.  Art and desire were bound from the start by the twin brothers Eros (Love) and Thanatos (Death).  This course will explore the co-presence of Eros and Thanatos in early modern Italian art and literature.  One of the key issues in this course is the blurring, transgression, and redefinition of these boundaries.  Lectures will explore issues related to spectatorship, containment, portraiture and necromancy, magic and lovesickness, disciplining the body, spiritual exercises, metamorphosis and martyrdom, and the spectacularisation of death and desire.
Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3205 Patrons and Painters in Elizabethan and Stuart England [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Nick Grindle
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Tuesdays 16.00-18.00.

This course is about the patronage of art and ceremony in the formative period of Britain's artistic history, from c.1558 to c.1714. Particular topics will include: the importance of the visual arts in the 'cult' of monarchy; ephemeral spectacles such as masques, progresses, triumphal entries, and courtly entertainments; the representation of power and authority; the representation of women; the influence of continental practice on English art; printed and medallic imagery; studio training and workshop practice; the effects of the Civil War on established patronage systems and art collecting and the beginnings of an art market. We'll make a number of visits to galleries and students will get a chance to practice different genres of art-historical writing, such as catalogue entries and editing texts, as a way of helping us work with the art objects more closely.
Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3206 Dutch Genre Painting [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Charles Ford
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Thursdays 11.00-13.00.

The course concentrates on the ‘everyday life’ imagery produced in the United Provinces during the 17th century. It is taught through gallery visits and seminars. It discusses art objects within the theoretical and institutional frameworks of art production at the time, as well as assessing the history of their evaluation and interpretation (eg issues relating to ‘Dutch realism’ and ‘hidden meanings’). Particular attention will be paid to the subject matter and style of Dutch genre painting in relation to contemporary social (class and gender) issues. Classes will be devoted to subjects such as: iconography and symbolism, developments and changes in subject matter and imagery, centres of production and individual painters.

Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3213 Abstract Art since 1945 [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Briony Fer
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Wednesdays 11.00-13.00.

This course examines the history of modernist and postmodernist art through the lens of abstraction.  During much of the twentieth century abstraction was considered the most ambitious art form,  on a par with the status attributed to history painting in previous centuries. We look at how abstract art came to look the way it does and locate it in a shifting set of beliefs about what constitutes art. The course is designed to understand the main developments within abstraction but also to question the conventional opposition drawn between abstraction and representation. In the sessions, a great deal of emphasis will be placed on the concerns of contemporary art now and the way the  work of artists making art today raise questions about the art of the past (for example, Gabriel Orozco, Tacita Dean, Roni Horn). Rather than concentrate on familiar figures from the canon, the course explores an expanded geography of abstraction, not only the US and Europe but also with a special interest in the art of Brazil (the neo-concretists Helio Oiticica, Mira Schendel,  and Lygia Clark for example). Not all the work examined will be ‘abstract’ in the strict sense, and we will look at such topics as the relation to the ready-made, the role of color, the notion of the monochrome. There will be gallery visits included in the course schedule.

Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3229 Postcoloniality [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Natasha Eaton
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Tuesdays 14.00-16.00.

Details to follow

Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3221 Art and Technology: Art & the Moving Image [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Matilde Nardelli
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Thursdays 16.00-18.00.

This course explores the relation between the moving image and art from the beginning of the 20th century to the present, providing a historical and critical context for the ‘cinematic turn’ of contemporary art and the diffusion of the moving image in culture at large. Though the course follows a roughly chronological order, the sessions are arranged thematically, exploring a number of theoretical concerns in the history of the moving image, and the way in which these concerns are articulated in a diverse body of moving-image works spanning from classics of the historical avant-garde and experimental cinema such as René Clair’s Entr’acte (1924) and Hollis Frampton’s (nostalgia) (1971) to video art, contemporary gallery installations and internet-based films. Taking as its main focus the – changing – material base of the moving image, from the celluloid of photochemical cinema to the digital code of contemporary video, the course will not only trace a history of the moving image in art, but also introduce some of the ways in which such image has been theorized as art. Through analysis of a range of works and critical texts (from ‘theories’ of the moving image to reflections on the medium on the part of practitioners themselves) we will situate debates about the sometimes contested status of the moving image as art, its aesthetics and materiality, its novelty and obsolescence, against the wider horizon of technological and media changes and their cultural impact.

Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3231 Materiality and Intermediality: Images, Journeys and Exchanges in Early Modern Europe [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Carla Benzan
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Fridays 11.00-13.00.

This course will examine the highly mobile nature of images in early modern Europe and their active role in social relations and exchanges. On the one hand, we will consider how journeys were represented across and between media. Oil painting, watercolour, wax sculpture, and engravings could depict different kinds of travel including the discovery of ‘new’ lands, the interior journeys of the soul, and public spectacles. On the other hand, the course asks students to consider the journeys made by images themselves, including objects and artworks in early modern collections, souvenirs produced for pilgrimage, and lifelike sculptures in public procession.

Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3101 Advanced Undergraduate Course in the History of Art (1) History, Memory and Ruins: Visualising the Past from Romanticism to 9/11  [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Stina Barchan
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Fridays 14.00-16.00.

This course will take students into an investigation of the cultural representations and interpretations of history and memory from the Romantic period to the present. In particular, we will focus on the construction of ‘the past’ in Germany, but we will also explore visual manifestations of memory in Soviet Russia, Britain and the United States. Emphasising the close relation between memory and everyday life, the course will examine a range of cultural forms and practices, such as architecture, monuments, museums, autobiographies, scrapbooks, photography, archives and film. The course aims to equip the students with a set of critical skills in visual analysis of the origins, forms and effects of the cultural constructions of history and memory.
Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3102 Advanced Undergraduate Course in the History of Art (2) Visual Culture and Political Ecology  [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: to be confirmed
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Thursdays 14.00-16.00.

What role do cultural practitioners—artists, activists, new media programmers, architects, theorists—play in relation to today’s manifold ecological crises? This course will consider the diverse ways visual culture intersects with environment, exploring subjects such as experimental documentary practice in video and photography, eco-art installations, radical gardening and urban farming, and neo-conceptual investigations, and how they confront the biopolitics of climate change, destruction of ecosystems, habitat and species loss, and global warming in the age of neoliberal globalization. We will examine post-nature speculative philosophy and rights-of-nature discourse, extinction studies and sci-fi utopias, assessing the critical and creative ways of negotiating eco-catastrophe and sustainable alternatives, eco-socialism and climate refugee discourse, the financialization of nature and indigenous approaches to the environment.
Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites: Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3103 Advanced Undergraduate Course in the History of Art (3) Us and Them: Modernity and the Representation of Armed Conflict [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Paul Fox
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Mondays 14.00-16.00.
This course explores artistic responses to armed conflict in the shifting political, social and technological contexts of the period. We work with theoretical frameworks concerning the construction of both national and gendered identities, witnessing and testimony, censorship, protest, trauma, and commemoration.
We assess how martial types have been constructed as political subjects, and explore how monuments, memorials and images of war have mediated remembrance of past events. We visit London’s military museums to consider the relationship between art and the non-art object. We examine official war art, protest art, battlefield illustration and photography to explore how artists negotiate boundaries imposed by censorship, notions of patriotic duty and propriety. We conclude by considering contemporary responses to 9/11, torture, and the trauma of war.
Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3104 Advanced Undergraduate Course in the History of Art (4) Home/Habitat/Community in Modern and Contemporary Italian Art [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Teresa Kittler
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Mondays 11.00-13.00.

By foregrounding the tropes of home, habitat and community, this course will consider some of the critical strategies of making and exhibiting art that developed in Italy in the postwar period in relation to the complex dichotomies that defined the country during the period: from its dialogue with artistic and craft traditions of the past within the context of rapid industrialization, to the so-called ‘economic miracle’ and the effects of American consumerism and to the mechanics of Italy’s desire to establish a particular kind of Italian Modernism that would also become internationally influential. We will explore how the idea of the domestic is taken up and redefined within artistic practice in a variety of ways at a time when Italy becomes synonymous with the design of environments and at the very moment when sculpture is redefined in terms of environmental and installation art. Each week will focus on key themes—from seminal exhibitions such as Arte Abitabile (Inhabitable Art) to the turn towards the domestic and the everyday in key artistic movements such as Arte Povera, as well as through ideas such as ‘convivio’ that define collective forms of making and experiencing art in this period. Focusing on key theoretical texts and alongside contemporary criticism we will consider the idea of domesticity in an expanded sense and in relation to the question of materiality, politics and the artist’s relationship to the environment.
Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.

HART3105 Advanced Undergraduate Course in the History of Art (5) Art and the Senses in Early Modernity [1.0 cu]

Course tutor: Alice Sanger
Timetabled
: Autumn and Spring terms; Wednesdays 11.00-13.00.

This course explores the ways in which the five senses were made to perform in Renaissance and Baroque art. We will ask: how were the operations of visual culture inflected with meaning because of the value attached to the faculties of hearing, smell, taste and touch, as well as sight? How were the cooperative functions of the senses conceptualised and staged – or problematised and rejected – in the art of the period? Classes address the thematisation of the senses in early modern art and cultural practice by interrogating a diverse collection of primary sources and the body of recent scholarship that evidences art history's 'sensory turn'. We will deal with the place of the senses in the work of artists such as Dürer, Titian, Caravaggio, Ribera, Artemisia Gentileschi and Bernini, while key areas of interest to the module include: the hierarchy of the senses and early modern theories of vision, sensuality, sacrality and devotion, gender and the sensorium, materiality and corporeality, the eroticisation of the senses, tactility and sculpture, and theatricality and the Baroque.
Duration of Course:  20+ weeks.
Student Contact Hours:
40+ hours.
Student Workload:
Prescribed and back-up reading, class presentation, private gallery visits, 2 essays, exam.
Means of Assessment:
Two 2000–2,500 word essays weighted at 45%; oral component 10% and a 3 hour exam in exam term weighted at 45%.
Prerequisites:
Completion of 2nd-year History of Art course or equivalent relevant  experience.




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