Degree structure

Degree Structure

Our undergraduate curriculum has changed. Below are details of the new curriculum which has been introduced for 1st year students in 2013-14. Current 2nd & 3rd year students follow the previous BA in Egyptian Archaeology Degree structure.

Classes at UCL take the form of lectures and small-group seminars, as well as laboratory sessions. Most of the degree is structured around a combination of core courses, which are fixed by us, and optional courses chosen by you from a wide range of possibilities.

The degree offers an introduction to archaeology, including Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology, and world history in the first year and drills down on Egyptian Archaeology and Ancient Egyptian language in the second and third years. Starting in year one and running through the entire degree, you will be taught in degree specific tutorials, in addition to the courses outlined below. The degree tutorials ensure abundant face-to-face contact with your teachers and help you develop your individual skills and profile. During years two and three, you can also choose options on scientific analysis and the archaeology of almost all areas in the world, including of the Near East, Africa, the Mediterranean, the Americas and Asia. We entertain close relationships with UCL History offering further courses on the Ancient Near East and the Classical World. Fieldwork is a compulsory element of the degree and an excellent foundation for fieldwork in Egypt, the Sudan, and the Near East.

The courses offered range from small seminar style discussion groups to survey lectures, usually backed up with small group tutorials. If you click on the course titles below you will obtain further information on the individual course contents. The degree balances training in Egyptian Archaeology, Ancient Egyptian language, and broader themes in archaeology. Third year dissertations in the past have covered a wide range of topics, from prehistory to gender in Ancient Egypt, and from object analysis to modern Egyptian heritage.

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 1

In your first year, you will receive a solid grounding in the both practical and theoretical methods in archaeology, as well as an introduction to major issues in Egyptian archaeology and writing. All students take the following core courses:

  • Introduction to Archaeology (ARCL1014, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • Field Methods (ARCL1015, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • Sites and Artefacts (ARCL1016, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • People and Environments (ARCL1017, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • World Archaeology: the deep history of human societies (ARCL1003, 1 course unit, 22 weeks)
  • Introduction to Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology (ARCL1009, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • Texts in Archaeology (ARCL1011, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)

Year 2

The second year provides you with a more advanced understanding of Egyptian archaeology and allows you to develop your own specialised interests by choosing options. All students take the following five core courses:

  • Archaeology of Ancient Egypt (ARCL2012, 1 course unit, 22 weeks)
  • Current Issues in Archaeological Theory (ARCL2028, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • Research and Presentation Skills (ARCL2038, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • Middle Egyptian Language and Texts (ARCL2024, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • Intermediate Middle Egyptian Texts (ARCL3009, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)

A further 1 course unit can be chosen from the wide range of 2nd and 3rd year Archaeology courses available each year. Those deemed particularly relevant to this degree include:

  • Interpreting Archaeological Evidence (ARCL2037, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • Issues in the Archaeology of Nubia (ARCL3050, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)
  • Understanding Complex Societies: Egypt and Mesopotamia in the 3rd millennium (ARCL3075, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks)

Year 3

In your third and final year, you continue to develop knowledge of particular subject areas through a choices of many course options, but are also given the chance to reflect critically on your fieldwork experience during the degree (see below) and to write a 10,000 word dissertation on a detailed subject that you will choose with the help of a supervisor. More precisely, all students do the following:

  • a Fieldwork Portfolio (ARCL3056; 0.5 course unit) 
  • a Dissertation (ARCL3024; 1 course unit)
  • Archaeology in the World (ARCL3097, 0.5 course unit, 11 weeks) *New course currently being developed*

A further 1.5 course units can be chosen from the wide range of 2nd and 3rd year Archaeology courses available each year while a further 0.5 course unit may be taken in Archaeology or a related subject. Those courses deemed particularly relevant to this degree are given above while new Egyptian language courses are currently being developed.


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