BA in Egyptian Archaeology

UCAS F424

Egyptian Archaeology at UCL is at the heart of a community of world-class Egyptologists based at the Institute of Archaeology, the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the British Museum and the Egypt Exploration Society, all located in walking distance on the Bloomsbury Campus. UCL is home of the first UK chair in Egyptian Archaeology (founded 1892), held by the pioneer of the discipline Sir Flinders Petrie, and traditionally is one of the leading universities in the field within the UK and internationally. Blessed with an unrivalled range of library and museum resources in London, Egyptian Archaeologists at UCL explore new directions in the discipline.

UCL Institute of Archaeology

What sets us apart from other Egyptology departments is an interest in the big questions arising from a global perspective on Ancient Egypt:

  • What is the contribution of Ancient Egypt – prehistoric, Pharaonic, and post-Pharaonic – to World History?
  • How has Egypt’s location on the interface of Africa, the Mediterranean, and the Near East impacted on Egyptian civilization?
  • How does environment in North Eastern Africa shape human behaviour and the formation of the material world?
  • Why does the past matter in current debates of Egyptian heritage within and outside Egypt?

We explore these and other questions through material culture and ancient texts offering training both in the Archaeology and language of Ancient Egypt. The location of UCL near the cultural and social attractions of London makes the Institute of Archaeology an ideal place for you to develop your career and personality. Follow our facebook page to find out more about our current and past activities.

Our teaching is structured around a series of lectures, seminars, and small group tutorials. You have a lot of individual learning support and will enjoy the welcoming and warm atmosphere students of the Institute of Archaeology praise. The degree structure is designed to familiarise you with broader questions of archaeology in the first year and zoom in on Egypt in the second and third years. You can choose from a wide range of options in World Archaeology and Sciences and have access to our lab facilities and collections. Many of our students in the past have progressed to MA level or went directly into employment, thanks to the high reputation of UCL and our training in transferable skills. Students with a particular interest in history and Ancient Egyptian language may also wish to explore the BA Ancient History and Egyptology at UCL History Department.

Degree benefits

  • The programme combines a broad grounding in archaeological method and theory alongside courses that focus on the language, art and archaeology of Egypt.
  • The UCL Institute of Archaeology is one of the largest archaeology departments in the world, with an unrivalled range of specialist staff. It hosts numerous lectures by visiting archaeologists.
  • The institute is home to one of the best archaeology libraries in the world and has its own teaching collections, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology.
  • Students have the opportunity to participate in staff-led research projects in many parts of the world, together with other field projects, thanks to UCL's fieldwork grants.

Most of the degree is structured around a combination of core and optional courses. In your first year, you will receive a solid grounding in both the practical and theoretical methods in archaeology, as well as an introduction to major issues in Egyptian archaeology and writing.

The second and third years provide a more advanced understanding of Egyptian archaeology and allow you to develop your own specialised interests by choosing options in particular subject areas.

In the third year you are given the chance to reflect critically on your fieldwork experience during the degree through a fieldwork portfolio, and write a 10,000-word dissertation on a detailed subject that you will choose with the help of a supervisor.

Your learning

You will be taught using a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, either field or laboratory-based. Full use is made of our extensive teaching and reference collections and close connections to the national museums and collections of London.

Assessment

Coursework, typically 1,500-2,500-word essays, is used to assess most courses. Most compulsory courses and some optional courses involve an examination element too. The completion of 70 days' fieldwork is a requirement for all archaeology students.


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