GURAN/1

Corpus Refs:Macalister/1945:252
Site:GURAN
Discovery:first mentioned, 1894 Lynch, P. J.
History:Macalister/1945, 246: `Found in a souterrain on this townland: moved afterwards to a garden at Gortatlea, near Tralee, and now in the National Museum, Dublin'.

Macalister cites an article by P.J. Lynch from 1894, and states that this paper, in turn, cites an undated piece from The Kerry Sentinel.

Geology:
Dimensions:1.19 x 0.32 x 0.41 (converted from Macalister/1945)
Setting:in display
Location:National Museum of Ireland
Macalister/1945, 246: `now in the National Museum, Dublin'.
Form:plain
Macalister/1945, 246: `An irregular stone, thickening upward in the manner of a clumsy club. 3' 8" -- 3' 11" high x 0' 9" x 1' 0" below, 1' 0 1/2" x 1' 4" above'.
Condition:complete , good
Folklore:none
Crosses:none
Decorations:no other decoration

References


Inscriptions


GURAN/1/1     Pictures

Readings

Macalister, R.A.S. (1945):DUMELIMAQIGL ||| ASIC ||| ONAS | NIOTTACOBRAN ||| OR[--
Expansion:
DUMELI MAQI GLASICONAS NIOTTA COBRANOR[IGAS]
Macalister/1945 247 reading only
McManus, D. (1991):DUMELIMAQIGL ||| ASIC ||| ONAS | NIOTTACOBRAN ||| [O]R[--
Expansion:
DUMELI MAQI GLASICONAS NIOTTA COBRANOR[--
McManus/1991 65 reading only

Notes

Orientation:mixed directions
Position:ind ; arris ; n/a ; undecorated
Macalister/1945, 247: `The inscription runs up one angle and turns at the top to the dexter side, running half round the edge of an oblique plane surface on the summit of the stone; then resumes at the bottom angle adjacent to the first of the sinister side, and again runs up to the top'.
Incision:inc
Date:None published
Language:Goidelic (ogham)
Ling. Notes:McManus/1991, 109--110, gives a full discussion of the form NIOTTA, likely 'nephew'. He also states that in `the case of [Macalister/1945 no.] 252 [this stone] it has been suggested (see Charles-Edwards/1971, 120 and Cathasaigh/1986, 144--145) that the NIOTTA has the status of a formula word and serves to indicate the kindred membership of Dumel(i)as who, as son of a c glas (witness the name GLASICONAS), an immigrant from outside Ireland, would have belonged to the kindred of his mother's brother. The theory is an attractive one though the equation of GLASICONAS with c glas is tentative and the construction is isolated'.

Also see McManus/1991, 102, 103, 116.

Palaeography:Macalister/1945, 247: `After 2R comes a round notch, after which again the edge is fractured, and should have been shown as such in the diagram. In the light of a suggestion made to me by Prof. MacNeill, I have re-examined the stone, and find that it could be quite possible to complete the last name as COBRANORIGAS, though no trace of the necessary additional scores survives. The only difficulty which I see is that the G would have to be very slightly shorter at its lower end than the preceding R, but this offers no valid objection to the restoration'.
Legibility:good
Lines:2
Carving errors:0
Doubtful:no

Names

References