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Curated Decay Book Panel Discussion

Start: Jun 22, 2017 06:00 PM
End: Jun 22, 2017 07:00 PM

Location: Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL Wilkins Building

AHRC

A book panel discussion exploring the new volume Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving will be held at UCL on 22 June.

Is it time to let some heritage sites go?  What happens if we choose not to intervene? What possibilities emerge when change is embraced rather than resisted? Caitlin DeSilvey's new book, Curated Decay: Heritage Beyond Saving (University of Minnesota Press, 2017), questions if we can preserve all heritage sites and if it might be better to allow some to decay.

Join the author (Associate Professor of Cultural Geography at the University of Exeter’s Environment and Sustainability Institute) in conversation with panellists

  • David Lowenthal (Emeritus Professor of Geography, UCL and author of The Past is a Foreign Country),
  • Haidy Geismar (Department of Anthropology, UCL, author of Treasured Possessions: Indigenous Interventions into Cultural and Intellectual Property),
  • Rodney Harrison (AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow, UCL Institute of Archaeology).

The panel will discuss and debate DeSilvey’s contributions to rethinking the conservation of natural and cultural heritage.

Registration

This is a free, ticketed event and everyone is welcome.  

Further details

  • Date:    Thursday 22 June 2017
  • Time:    6pm to 7pm, with drinks reception to follow
  • Venue: Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, Wilkins Building, University College London followed by a drinks reception in the South Cloisters 

This event is sponsored by the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and is organised by the AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow. General event queries can be directed to Professor Rodney Harrison at r.harrison@ucl.ac.uk

About the book

Is it time to let some heritage sites go?  A new book by Caitlin DeSilvey questions if we can preserve all heritage sites and if it’s best to allow some to decay.

There is room to explore more creative approaches in how we care for heritage,” said Professor DeSilvey, of the Environment and Sustainability Institute on the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus in Cornwall. “What happens if we choose not to intervene? What possibilities emerge when change is embraced rather than resisted? What if we allow things to become ruins?"

Curated Decay by DeSilvey proposes rethinking the care of certain vulnerable sites in terms of ecology and entropy, explaining how we must adopt an ethical stance that allows us to collaborate with - rather than defend against - natural processes.