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WWI: The Spectre of Gas Warfare

7 January 2014

WWI: The Spectre of Gas Warfare

As 2014 marks the beginning of the Centenary of the First World War, Gabriel Moshenska was invited to reflect on one of the iconic artefacts of this period.

The Centenary of the First World War has already sparked considerable political and historiographical debate, as well as reflections on the last hundred years of global conflict.

As part of their WW1 Centenary activities, the think tank Chatham House invited conflict archaeologist Gabriel Moshenska to reflect on one of the iconic artefacts of the First World War - the gas mask - and the legacies of gas warfare into the present.

  • Gabriel's article entitled An Ecstasy of Fumbling for the Chatham House publication The World Today is available here»
  • He also contributed his research expertise to a video on The Spectre of Gas Warfare which may be viewed here»

Gabriel's research interests include projects on the Archaeology of Air Raid Shelters and Children and the Material Culture of Conflict. He is is Course Co-ordinator for the Institute's Master's course on Archaeologies of Modern Conflict.

Gabriel has co-edited a volume on the Archaeologies of Internment for the WAC One World Archaeology series and is also the author of a recent volume entitled The Archaeology of the Second World War: Uncovering Britain’s Wartime Heritage.

Chatham House is a membership based policy institute which brings together people and organizations with an interest in international affairs.