Institute of Archaeology

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First for Archaeology in UK 2015

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Rock Art from the Antipodes-Australia & South Africa

Publication date: Jul 19, 2012 1:50:29 PM

Start: Oct 3, 2012 2:00:00 PM
End: Oct 3, 2012 6:00:00 PM

Location: Institut Francais, South Kensington, London SW7

Nawarla Gabarnmang rock shelter

Didier Bouakaze-Khan will organise a rock art seminar and screening of Patricia Marquet's film on the archaeology of rock art in Jawoyn Country at the Institut Français on 3 October.

The Narwala Gabarnmang massive rock shelter is one of the oldest known Aboriginal sites in Australia and is located in the aboriginal region Jawoyn Country. Narwala Gabarnmang is covered on its ceiling and pillars with rock art, and only accessible by a 90-minute helicopter journey from the outback town of Katherine.

Researchers consider the site one of the most extensive rock art sites in the world and it has been described as the Sistine Chapel of Australian rock art sites due to the ceiling art of the shelter.

  • Professor Jean-Michel Geneste, Director of the Centre National de Prehistoire in France, in charge of Lascaux Cave and Scientific Director of Chauvet Cave, will introduce his groundbreaking research at Nawarla Gabarnmang.
  • Patricia Marquet will present the film she directed during field work at the site: Connecting Country. Archaeology of Rock Art in Jawoyn Country.
  • Professor David Lewis-Williams, founder of the Rock Art Research Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa will be Cracking the Bushman Code: Southern African San, or Bushmen, made some of the most complex and detailed rock art in the world. But what does it mean?

These talks and films will explain how researchers tapped into 19th century sources or used precise archaeological research to unravel the significance of some very strange images, allowing us to see, at least a little, into prehistoric minds.

This free event, sponsored by the French Institute in London, is organised by Didier Bouakaze-Khan, Rock Art Courses coordinator at the UCL Institute of Archaeology and Senior Research Fellow at the Rock Art Research Institute in South Africa. Didier currently teaches on World Rock Art: from Palaeolithic to the Present and Rock Art Studies: Theories, Methods and Management at UCL.

Places at this event are limited, and registration is essential at d.bouakaze-khan@ucl.ac.uk and nicole.bea@diplomatie.gouv.fr