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Financing Archaeology: The Economic History of Archaeology

Publication date: Mar 30, 2012 01:54 PM

Start: May 02, 2012 10:00 AM
End: May 02, 2012 06:00 PM

Location: UCL Institute of Archaeology

Excavations at Jerash (Horsfield Collection, IoA, UCL)

The IoA History of Archaeology Research Network will host a workshop on 'Financing Archaeology: the economic history of archaeology - perspectives from the past for the future' at the Institute on 2 May.

The workshop will address directly the issue of funding in archaeology at a time when funding for research is in jeopardy. By taking a long-range view of the ways in which archaeologists have dealt with limited funding (particularly government funding) in the past, the workshop will provide a historical background to current economic debates on funding and archaeology, tying the historical context firmly to the modern day. It also will also provide a platform for discussing public engagement in archaeology, and the (economic) value of archaeology in a broader social and political context.

Workshop speakers include:

  • Gabriel Moshenska, Exchanging Mummies: networks, finance and public display
  • Thomas Kiely, Penny wise, pound foolish? The finances of the British Museum excavations on Cyprus 1893–1899
  • David Clarke, Financing Heritage: Excavation, Acquisition, Display and the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in the late 19th and early 20th centuries
  • Chris Naunton, "...of universal, profound and very touching interest. My topic is money." The Egypt Exploration Fund and the financial imperative
  • Rachael Sparks, Publicising Petrie
  • Sara Perry, Visual economies and the foundation of the Institute of Archaeology (London)
  • Kenneth Aitchison, Developer Funding for Archaeology – A Contemporary History
  • Tim Schadla-Hall, Funding in the future- old ideas – new clothes
  • Lisa Westcott-Wilkins, Brendon Wilkins, Rashka Dave, DigVentures

This event is free (although registration is required) and will be followed by a reception.  This event is funded by an award from the UCL Institute of Archaeology.

Please direct any enquiries about the event to Amara Thornton