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MA Creative & Collaborative Enterprise

The MA Creative & Collaborative Enterprise is a specialised masters programme for students who wish to become creative and collaborative entrepreneurs once they graduate and want to set up enterprises that are dependent on their values and ethos.

Our teaching will

  • help you become a creative and collaborative entrepreneur,
  • put you in a position to establish enterprises where what you do and the way you do things are in harmony.

It draws on:

  • performing arts practise,
  • social theory,
  • entrepreneurship training,
  • UCL’s cross-disciplinary culture,
  • the great entrepreneurial base in London.

By drawing on world leading performing arts practise, the anthropological world view and the energy and expertise of the UCL School of Management we are able to offer alternative, surprising and rewarding routes into the startup economy.

The MA will not just produce creative and collaborative entrepreneurs but socially aware and intellectually literate ones with the tenacity to push on.

You will develop a critical methodology towards creative processes, storytelling, visual language, ethics, collaboration, leadership, competitiveness and organisational structures and a rigorous application of theory to your own business ideas.

As a result you and your cohort will form a steady stream of critical and creative entrepreneurs, aware of the intellectual and social value of cultural difference.

Why now?

More and more people are working for themselves and setting up their own businesses.

Many of these are based on one creative idea and they may go to market and rise or fall without figuring out a sustainable way forward.

Often, organisations are created on a wing and a prayer with structures copied from existing businesses and without a thought as to how they might grow.

This MA in Creative & Collaborative Enterprise addresses the fundamentals of creativity and collaboration to give students an understanding of the commercial aspects of creative enterprise and a wider range of possible actions and choices of how to build and grow a self-organising and sustainable organisation.

You could choose to take inspiration from Google (who focus on their users) rather than Yahoo (which serves the advertiser); or from John Lewis (set up as a partnership) rather than a retailer with a traditional hierarchy.

The creative economy provides jobs for 2.5 million people (more than the financial services, advanced manufacturing or construction).

In recent years this creative workforce has grown four times faster than the workforce as a whole.

Behind this success, however, lies much disruption and business uncertainty, associated with digital technologies and globalisation.

Previously profitable business models have been swept away and young companies have dominated new internet markets.

Technology continues to evolve rapidly and radically, guaranteeing further disturbances to established players and opportunities for innovators.

There are corresponding movements towards technology-free or technology-less activities.

Examples of this are: Big Data, the Internet of Things, Wearable Computers, Assisted Creativity, the Maker Movement, Slow Food, and the Rise of Mending.

This degree will prepare you to enter, engage with and thrive in this new environment. 

UCL is at the centre of London’s creative, entrepreneurial and artistic culture.

UCL is committed to solving real world problems.

UCL’s innovation in using world class performing artists to enhance, extend and disrupt research, leading to deeper or more surprising outcomes.

The MA Creative & Collaborative Enterprise brings together:

  • the radical spirit, rigour and openness embodied in UCL Anthropology,
  • the teaching excellence of the UCL School of Management, and
  • the distilled essence of creative and performing arts practice.

The MA Creative & Collaborative Enterprise draws upon world-class resources at UCL including:

  • the research culture of the Department of Anthropology to provide a rigorous context for students’ decision making;
  • the deep expertise in startups of the UCL School of Management;
  • the wide-ranging support for student enterprise offered by staff who currently work for UCL Innovation & Enterprise;
  • the research into effective creativity in UCL Brain Sciences, Computer Science, Maths & Physical Sciences, the School of Management, and the Slade School of Art;
  • the partnership between UCL and world class performing arts companies in London including English National Opera, Improbable and the Young Vic;
  • the team of creative and collaborative experts associated with UCL via the SLASH Knowledge and Transfer and Enterprise Board and the work of the UCL Creative Entrepreneur in Residence.

The anthropological context - and links with the Policy and Practice strand of MA Social Anthropology – allows students to systematically consider questions from more than one cultural context as well as address ethical issues in a global context.

It draws upon UCL Anthropology's pioneering role in providing training grounded in social theory in policy and practice, materials and design and the digital world.

This MA allows you to benefit from UCL’s unique position in the heart of London.

London was recently identified as the third best city in the world in which to study by QS Top Universities on criteria such as student mix, quality of living, opportunities and affordability.

London is one of the world’s leading centres of entrepreneurship.

As of November 2016, there are hundreds of investors, dozens of “startup accelerators”, nearly 100 co-working spaces aimed at supporting startups, and thousands of would-be high impact startups.

The “ecosystem effect”, in which startups thrive because of their access to the talent pool and capital attracted by the presence of other startups is well known and makes London one of the best places in the world to pursue a startup.

London is the home of world-leading players in fashion, design, video gaming, food, retail, advertising, media, education, publishing, music, and creative industries.

The MA Creative and Collaborative Enterprise can introduce its students to the heart of the relevant part of the ecosystem they most need in order to develop their startup.

In terms of access to talent, capital and the innovation-oriented consumers and enterprises who make a startup’s first customers, London is the best option for pursuing enterprise in Europe.

UCL has a thriving Innovation & Enterprise culture and a dedicated department to ensure that the economic and societal benefits of UCL research are fully realised.

UCL Innovation and Enterprise brings together academics, the business community and other potential beneficiaries of UCL research in order to maximise its potential for commercialisation and ‘real world’ use.

Through UCL Innovation & Enterprise, students will be able to:

  • attend inspiring weekly guest lectures delivered by leading business people and successful entrepreneurs;
  • compete in the London Entrepreneurs Challenge, the China UK Challenge, and the Bright Ideas Award;
  • network across the UCL’s world-leading Faculties of Engineering, Arts & Humanities, Brain Sciences, Life Sciences, Medical Sciences and the Bartlett, UCL’s Faculty of the Built Environment, to find fellow entrepreneurs and potential collaborators and co-founders;
  • take part in the UCL Innovation & Enterprise Idea Accelerator in Summer 2018;
  • on graduation, have the opportunity to continue their startup journey within UCL Innovation & Enterprise in the Hatchery, at BASE KX, or IDEALondon; or at Seedcamp, Techstars, Barclays Techstars, or Wayra outside it.

The course is focused on helping students create a new creative or collaborative venture, or advance one they have already started.

The combination of modules on offer will provide students with a professional training to startup a creative and collaborative enterprise from grassroots level and sustain your organisation beyond the initial 3–5 year period.

You will gain an understanding of creativity and collaboration together with the business and entrepreneurial skills required to make a successful innovative venture in an information-rich digitally connected world.

You will gain a solid core of creative, collaborative and business skills and the research behind them and the social theory to put them into context.

All students will take a new course – An Introduction to Understanding the Social World – a foundation course at the start of the year oriented to students who are new to social science.

In this way the programme draws on the world-class expertise and resources in the Department of Anthropology to give a grounding in social theory and analysis, social research methods, including ethnographic approaches to the study of contemporary society and their interface with professional practices in the world at large.

This new programme uses the model of the successful MSc Entrepreneurship course run by UCL School of Management with eight core modules and a 10,000 word dissertation outlining the student’s own business feasibility plan.

The programme structure comprises three new courses taught as the core of Creative and Collaborative Enterprise:

You are also required to take from Anthropology:

And from the School of Management:

MSING007B: Entrepreneurial Finance
MSING009: Managing the Growing Firm MSING058: Entrepreneurial Marketing and Analytics MSING037: Customer Development and lean Startup

In Term 3 and up to early September 2018, students develop a dissertation project, working with a “real world” mentor from the London startup community.

The project allows those who are “starting up” immediately to work full time on developing their startup, and those who are not starting up immediately to conduct field research-based investigations of the desirability, feasibility and viability of a business opportunity.

The dissertation project is documented in a 10,000 word report.

Students have the ability to organise or join Treks to visit other startup ecosystems, which typically travel at the beginning of Term 3.

Past treks have visited Tel Aviv and Silicon Valley.

ANTHGU01: Creative Enterprise

This module applies the practises, habits and disciplines that lead to creative outputs and gives students the tools and techniques that ease the fear of a blank beginning and open the mind to new possibilities.

You will be trained to find expressive forms for their ideas, fashion them into products and learn how to inspire and speak to others in a way that goes beyond the traditional marketing pitch.

This module introduces, demonstrates and applies creative techniques from world class performing arts practitioners including Mike Alfreds (theatre director), Anne Bogart (theatre director), Declan Donnellan (theatre director), Keith Johnstone (teacher of improvisation), Phelim McDermott (theatre and opera director), Katie Mitchell (theatre and opera director) and Twyla Tharp (choreographer).

Techniques include: 1 Preparation. How to prepare for creativity; 2 Your Creative DNA. Beginning from where you are, with what you have to hand; 3 Drawing from memory. Using your history and circumstances as source material; 4 Holding creativity. Protecting your creative time and space and getting going; 5 Scratch. Taking inspiration from and absorbing influences from other disciplines and activities; 6 Accidents. Using conflict, luck, coincidence and collaborators; 7 The spine. Understand and articulate the inner dynamic of your project; 8 Skill. Acquiring what’s needed for the delivery or execution of your idea; 9 Get into the groove, get out of a rut. Using work patterns to your advantage; 10 The A in fAilure. Use mistakes to validate and drive forward a project; 11 The Long Run. Visualisation and milestones; 12 Improvisation. Saying Yes. Act first. Observe; and 13 Resistance. The shadow-side of creativity: overcoming doubt, fear, procrastination and self-sabotage.

Learning outcomes:

Through the successful completion of the course you will learn: How to initiate and begin a creative process to examine a problem or opportunity; How to create and co-create many varied and alternative responses to a particular question; How to nurture and sustain a creative process beyond initial impulse or success to lead to lasting solutions; How to evaluate creative outputs and recognise what is usable; How to share a creative process and engage with users, collaborators and customers; How to reflect and communicate creative responses, learnings and findings.

ANTHGU02: Creative Product Development

This module cultivates a critical methodology towards product function, name and form, and introduces creative design practises to: Give ideas the meaning or emotional resonance which adds value; Evaluate, monitor and adjust creative outputs;  Generate creative products and the stories of those products in tandem; Use visual language, ‘look and feel’ and narrative to shape products; Embed sharing into creative products or services so that they are both shaped by and shape customer response before launch; Show how to stand out in a world where everyone is vying for each other’s attention.

The module introduces creative practises to develop new products and services that begin their journey to market before they are ready so that the story of their evolution becomes part of their appeal.

The resulting output will be a portfolio of creative ideas for products and services which demonstrates a student’s ability to identify opportunities, develop several possible value propositions and through creative techniques, develop and test minimum viable products or services that will evolve and respond to feedback.

This module draws from the research of Yvonne Rogers (Chair of Interaction Design, Director of UCLIC, Department of Computer Science) in Secrets of Creative People (2014) showing that “successful creativity arises from sharing, constraining, narrating, connecting and even sparring nascent ideas with others, both in the flesh and through the web of social media.”

The aim is to help entrepreneurs in their journey of bringing ideas to life through the exercise of number of methodologies - both practical and theoretical - for discovering opportunities, developing offers, producing mock-ups and test items in tandem with a series of conversations with collaborators, customers and others in both real world and virtual scenarios.

Creative practises for product development that we will use include: Collage / mash up; Dreaming Time; Imitation; Juxtaposition; Interrogation; Metaphor; Provocation; Repetition; Substitution; Storytelling; Step and Repeat; Suspension of Judgement; Then What Happens?; Translation; Turning up; and, The Wow Moment.

ANTHGU03: Collaborative Enterprise

Successful collaborations don't happen by chance they must be created, nurtured and maintained through specific actions.

Achieving common goals in a business enterprise requires group trust, commitment and sacrifice.

The Collaborative Enterprise module will give tools and techniques for: planning and preparing collaborative work; understanding the building blocks of collaborative enterprise; identifying collaborative behaviours; and techniques for responding to and positively redirecting these behaviours to make collaboration a grounded practise rather than a question of luck or chemistry.

Collaborative enterprise requires the creation of a special bond between the participants based on commitment, sacrifice and support.

This module will introduce some key concepts , tools and techniques of collaboration derived from management studies, the practises of world class sports teams (including the All Blacks, San Francisco 49ers, European Ryder Cup teams) and leading performing arts ensembles (including Peter Brook, Frantic Assembly, Jerzy Grotowski, Improbable and Theatre du Soleil).

This course will also draw on experience and insights from the Project Management programs in the Barlett and will also seek to engage Dyson and the Design Council.

Collaborative enterprise involves building a culture that sustains beyond the individual entrepreneur.

This module will draw on the work of Dr Sarah Harvey (Reader in Organisational Behaviour, UCL School of Management) showing how the creative process is different for individuals and for groups and how groups identify creative ideas and the criteria by which they decide which ones to pursue; James Berry (Lecturer, UCL School of Management) on how ideas are generated, evaluated, selected and implemented and motivation and workplace creativity; Dr Hayley Newman (UCL Slade School of Art) on how collectives function; and the comparative studies of the ways in which people live in different social and cultural settings and how societies organise themselves and the cultural practices in which they engage (UCL Anthropology).

The ‘bees’ and the ‘trees’: relationships between big and small businesses where entrepreneurs can create and disrupt supply chains and offer speedy solutions to deep rooted organisations.

Learning outcomes.

Through the successful completion of the course the students will learn: How to help individuals from a coherent group; How to create self-organising groups and events; How to recognise good candidates for partnership; How to balance competitiveness and teamwork; How to lead without leading by uniting process and purpose; How to build cross-cultural partnerships; How to transform dysfunctional collaborations; How to identify and form tribes; How to collaborate with communities both real and online.

ANTHGF02: An Introduction to Social Theory

This course is intended to provide Masters’ students at UCL who have no prior, university level, social science expertise, with an introduction to the history and current pertinence of social thought and some of the research methodologies associated with different theoretical models.

The course is in particular designed for students taking masters programs which are using a social science perspective or approach in order to broaden and deepen a line of enquiry or practice. This includes the MA in Ethnographic and Documentary Film and Digital Anthropology as well as Creative and Collaborative Enterprise but it is designed to appeal to a broader constituency beyond anthropology as well.

The course will introduce students to a range of types of explanation in social theory including but not limited to:

  • Determinist explanations and in particular various forms of environmental determinism from Montesqieu to recent ecological approaches like that of Jared Diamond;
  • Individualist accounts of social action and the theories of the agent /actor on which they rest;
  • Social or holistic accounts of human action (from Durkheim to various modern holisms);
  • social constructionism;
  • Functionalist explanations of social behaviour and institutions;
  • Marxian forms of determinism;
  • The Masters of Suspicion (Freud and others);
  • Various forms of auto or reflexives social science.

Each week we examine a particular issue or topic and through that explore one particular strand of social theory. So, for instance, one week we look at the role of counting (quantitative methods) in social theory and policy oriented work and relate it back to the utilitarian approach to understanding social action and its empiricist, atomising strategies.

Finally, the course is meant to be supportive of particular students' interests and the essay you write will try and link up those interests with the body of work we discuss in the course.

As a result of taking this course you will:

  • be familiar with a range of fundamental questions within and approaches to social theory;
  • be familiar with the outlines of the historical development of social theory;
  • become familiar with some specific disciplinary approaches to and contributions to social research and theory;
  • become familiar with a range of methodological strategies for the generation and interrogation of data;
  • be in a position to discriminate among some of the major writers in social theory, and to decide for yourself which approach to use when approaching particular social problems have learnt to produce, at an introductory level,  critical writing about social theory.
MSING007B: ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE

This module provides the necessary knowledge and skills to enable a student to understand the nature and characteristics of financial planning in the context of entrepreneurship. This involves the understanding of the key financial statements; the financial planning process; the financial risks/rewards of entrepreneurship and innovation; new venture financial models and strategies; typical funding sources; the development of business presentations to attract outside funding; the due diligence process; and the strategies for negotiations for funding.

The module is divided into two parts. The finance part (taught by Simon Hulme) will enable students to understand all the key financial statements and concepts. The objective is to make students confident when talking to accounting professionals, bankers or venture capitalists about financial data. Classes are highly inter-active and short case studies and practical exercises are used to support the learning process. The financial assignment involves building a simple financial model in Excel, which can be used as a practical tool for a real-life start-up business, should the student wish.

The fundraising part of the module (taught by Itxaso del Palacio) is focused on understanding the process of raising external capital. This covers areas such as valuations of startups, due diligence processes, term sheets and negotiations with investors. Several professional investors and entrepreneurs will be sharing their experience and knowledge with students. Students will be able to meet them and learn from their experiences.

Learning outcomes. By the end of this module, a successful student will have gained an appropriate knowledge and understanding of: Nature, purpose and characteristics of income statements, cash flow statements, balance sheets as financial reporting mechanisms; The use of financial ratios in measuring and interpreting financial performance; The use of break-even analysis; The use of capital investment appraisal; The practical construction of new venture financial models in Excel; The evaluation of alternative financing strategies; The development of a strategy to approach the right investors; The development of a deck and pitch to attract outside funding; An effective due diligence process; The design and negotiation of “deals” and term sheets.

MSING009: MANAGING THE GROWING FIRM

This module considers the challenges faced by small firms that are aiming to become big ones. This is an integrative course that concentrates on the general management challenges facing founders or managers in entrepreneurial, high-growth and high-tech businesses.

Learning outcomes. The main objectives are to: Give students an insight into what running an early stage growing business actually entails. Provide an overview of the major strategic and operational issues that typically confront young growing businesses. Provide frameworks for anticipating the likely growth issues in the business.

Topics covered include: Barriers to growth and strategies to overcome them; Finance for high-growth enterprises – including cash management, funding growth; Organising for growth; Stakeholder perspectives in a growing business; Growth models, adaptation and evolution and managing transitions; Non-organic growth – e.g. roll-ups, buy/sell businesses

The course will draw on a range of case studies of ventures (not just high-technology) to illustrate the challenges of creating high potential enterprises.

MSING058: Entrepreneurial Marketing and Analytics

This course introduces key marketing concepts, methods and strategic issues of relevance to start-up and early stage entrepreneurs.  In addition, the key concepts of date analytics as they relate to entrepreneurial marketing will be addressed.

Students will study creating and capturing value, differentiation and positioning, segmentation, market and customer research, forecasting and pricing, creating an online presence, communications, networking, community and ecosystem, market entry strategies, channel analytics and quantitative customer segmentation.

MSING037: CUSTOMER DEVELOPMENT AND LEAN STARTUP

The module introduces tools and techniques appropriate to starting a new venture based on the individual founder and founding team’s knowledge, skills, network and personal vision.

This includes tools to: identify a suitable arena for developing a venture and how to enter and work within that arena; undertake “customer development” to identify unmet customer needs and formulate hypotheses about how to meet those needs in a feasible way; attract and develop a founding team; develop a mission in order to attract a “tribe” or following around the venture; develop a business model.

Learning outcomes. Following completion of this module, students will be able to: Understand the principles of effectual entrepreneurship: Starting, Partnering, Managing loss, Seeking secrets; Understand the tools available for following the principles; Use, and reflect on the use of, some of the tools, such as customer development, business modelling, tribe identification and mobilisation, lean startup techniques.

ANTHGU99: Feasibility Study (Dissertation)

This module provides an opportunity for students to assimilate what they have learned during the eight taught modules of the MA Creative and Collaborative Enterprise course and apply it to a new business opportunity that is of interest to them.

The resulting output is intended to be a comprehensive document to prove that students can apply learning, contrast theory with practice, analyse problems and propose solid well-considered recommendations.

The Creative and Collaborative Enterprise Feasibility Study is focused on implementing a new business opportunity.

Your Business Plan will be developed in several stages through Terms 1, 2 and 3.

The Creative Enterprise, Creative Product Development and Collaborative Enterprise modules encourage students to simultaneously and continuously create, prototype, test and share new products in the market place as part of the learning process.

The dissertation/business plan will in some ways be a record of progress and a preparation for implementation.4 LEARNING

The creative process involves exploration, breaking the rules, being unpredictable, surprising and even outrageous. Creativity welcomes failure: “if you’re not making mistakes then you’re not working hard enough.”

This course will promote creativity in three main ways:

  • making unfamiliar combinations of familiar ideas, combinations that make sense but have not been considered before;
  • exploring conceptual spaces to enable students to see something they had not seen before; and
  • transforming a space to allow someone to think of something they could not have thought of before.

After the event the conditions where this happens are often accredited to luck or circumstance or natural talent but the experience of making creative art suggests otherwise.

This MA, bringing together leading research in social and cultural anthropology, management science, neuroscience, and performing arts practice, will explore the practices by which creativity can be nurtured, encouraged, unleashed and exploited in an entrepreneurial fashion.

Creativity adds meaning to the things or services that people need or want.

There's a world of difference between the T-shirt picked up in Primark and a replica Barcelona shirt, between the shirt endorsing Taylor Swift and the one designed by Alexander McQueen.

They all cover you up and keep you warm but they have a different meaning and feeling for the people that desire them.

These meanings and feelings are the products of creativity.

They are the aim of creative enterprise: the added value that people are prepared to pay for.

The course will provide you with a research-led understanding of innovative ways to:

  • generate and test creative products or services, engage with market places, work with and for each other, and reach wider audiences;
  • think about the fundamental question of ‘why’ you do enterprise; and
  • think creatively about questions of how you organise your activities.

From the first week, you will be interviewing prospective customers, learning how to do “rapid prototyping”, using the tools of “lean” entrepreneurship, and pitching new ideas.

Using UCL’s networks and reputation as a starting point to access London’s thriving entrepreneurship scene, you will find or develop a founding team and learn how to “bootstrap” your business.

You will learn by doing among like-minded students who will be your allies during this training– and in some cases the co-founders with whom you will establish your future business.

You will be assessed on the products you create; the leadership and collaboration skills you show in practical sessions; and your business plan.

Leading the MA will be one senior tutor per group (normally 12-16 students) chosen from amongst the most skilled practitioners of the creative performing arts in the UK.

The course is taught with a “learn by doing” approach.

While, like any UCL Masters degree, a rigorous base of research underlies the programme, the emphasis is on supporting students to develop the skills needed to succeed as the initiator or co-founder of a creative and collaborative business

Modules are academically testing, require essays and reading key texts, and three of the eight modules include an end-of-year examination.

However, all coursework is intended to give students an opportunity to develop a startup, and most of the teaching is collaborative, experiential and driven by “build measure learn” cycles where students take action, analyse and reflect on the effects caused by that action, and decide on the next action to take.

Throughout the programme, we build in opportunities to connect with experienced, highly engaged mentors who, like our teaching team, are seeking to share their experience and wisdom with the “next generation” of entrepreneurs who come to UCL from around the world.

There is no other post-graduate degree course like it in the world:  based in a top global University, but also focused entirely on the creation of new creative and collaborative ventures, rather than on “innovation” more generally.

Students who are looking for a teaching team committed to delivering a transformative educational experience for would-be entrepreneurs should apply.

The dissertation/business plan will in some ways be a record of progress and a preparation for implementation.

The creative process involves exploration, breaking the rules, being unpredictable, surprising and even outrageous. Creativity welcomes failure: “if you’re not making mistakes then you’re not working hard enough.”

This course will promote creativity in three main ways:

  • making unfamiliar combinations of familiar ideas, combinations that make sense but have not been considered before;
  • exploring conceptual spaces to enable students to see something they had not seen before; and
  • transforming a space to allow someone to think of something they could not have thought of before.

After the event the conditions where this happens are often accredited to luck or circumstance or natural talent but the experience of making creative art suggests otherwise.

This MA, bringing together leading research in social and cultural anthropology, management science, neuroscience, and performing arts practice, will explore the practices by which creativity can be nurtured, encouraged, unleashed and exploited in an entrepreneurial fashion.

Creativity adds meaning to the things or services that people need or want.

There's a world of difference between the T-shirt picked up in Primark and a replica Barcelona shirt, between the shirt endorsing Taylor Swift and the one designed by Alexander McQueen.

They all cover you up and keep you warm but they have a different meaning and feeling for the people that desire them.

These meanings and feelings are the products of creativity.

They are the aim of creative enterprise: the added value that people are prepared to pay for.

The course will provide you with a research-led understanding of innovative ways to:

  • generate and test creative products or services, engage with market places, work with and for each other, and reach wider audiences;
  • think about the fundamental question of ‘why’ you do enterprise; and
  • think creatively about questions of how you organise your activities.

From the first week, you will be interviewing prospective customers, learning how to do “rapid prototyping”, using the tools of “lean” entrepreneurship, and pitching new ideas.

Using UCL’s networks and reputation as a starting point to access London’s thriving entrepreneurship scene, you will find or develop a founding team and learn how to “bootstrap” your business.

You will learn by doing among like-minded students who will be your allies during this training– and in some cases the co-founders with whom you will establish your future business.

You will be assessed on the products you create; the leadership and collaboration skills you show in practical sessions; and your business plan.

Leading the MA will be one senior tutor per group (normally 12-16 students) chosen from amongst the most skilled practitioners of the creative performing arts in the UK.

The course is taught with a “learn by doing” approach.

While, like any UCL Masters degree, a rigorous base of research underlies the programme, the emphasis is on supporting students to develop the skills needed to succeed as the initiator or co-founder of a creative and collaborative business

Modules are academically testing, require essays and reading key texts, and three of the eight modules include an end-of-year examination.

However, all coursework is intended to give students an opportunity to develop a startup, and most of the teaching is collaborative, experiential and driven by “build measure learn” cycles where students take action, analyse and reflect on the effects caused by that action, and decide on the next action to take.

Throughout the programme, we build in opportunities to connect with experienced, highly engaged mentors who, like our teaching team, are seeking to share their experience and wisdom with the “next generation” of entrepreneurs who come to UCL from around the world.

There is no other post-graduate degree course like it in the world:  based in a top global University, but also focused entirely on the creation of new creative and collaborative ventures, rather than on “innovation” more generally.

Students who are looking for a teaching team committed to delivering a transformative educational experience for would-be entrepreneurs should apply.

Tutors

Gregory Thompson

The senior tutor and course leader for the Creative and Collaborative Enterprise course is Gregory Thompson.

Gregory is a Theatre Director and UCL Creative Entrepreneur in Residence.

For the past two years at UCL Gregory has been matching scientists with performing artists to enhance, extend and disrupt academic activities to yield deeper or more surprising research outcomes.

He has been applying creative and collaborative practises to enterprise activities and training clinical academics in new forms of teamwork and leadership skills adapted from performing arts techniques.

Gregory was Director and Chief Executive of The Tron Theatre in Glasgow combining producing and presenting performances with a restaurant and bar business and increasing turnover, attracting leading Scottish and UK performing arts companies to Glasfow and nurturing up and coming talent.

As a theatre director Gregory has won awards for productions that combine ensemble performances with innovative stagings and actor-audience relationships.

He’s directed for the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Young Vic amongst others in the UK, was, his own company AandBC has performed Shakespeare all over world, and recently he has directed THE WINTER’S TALE in Urdu in Karachi, Pakistan and HAMLET in Nepali in Kathmandu, Nepal.

Across the course we employ the most skilled creative practitioners and entrepreneurs from the creative industries to deliver our innovative courses with practise-based learning.

Our teachers are leaders in their fields of creative and collaborative practice with great communicative skills, so that students can benefit from their non-university-focused experiences in the wider world of the creative industries and enterprise cultures.

All staff on this course will move back and forth between professional and teaching work so that over the years individual tutors may vary.

The School of Management modules are taught with a “learn by doing” approach with an emphasis on supporting students to develop the skills needed to succeed as founder of an innovative business.

The School of Management teaching team is made up entirely of faculty with experience both of academia and of the world of industry and entrepreneurship, including three active venture capitalists and investors.

Gregory Thompson

Gregory began life as an entrepreneur when he ran a stall selling nuts and dried fruit on Chapel Market in Islington to fund his university years at the LSE.

He set up his own theatre company, AandBC, which grew from productions on the London fringe to touring the world and collaborating with companies like Theatre Royal Bath and the Royal Shakespeare Company.

He worked for ten years with Peter Bonnici (Quadrant, g.co) in brand expression creating visual languages for both public and private clients, both small and large, from charities to government health trusts, from startups to multi-nationals like Logica.

Recently he has helped develop UCL’s Enterprise for School students’ programme,Citrus Saturday, and developed and ran the 2017 UCL Advances Idea Accelerator with a participant-centred learn by doing approach.

His theatre work includes HENRY VIII and AS YOU LIKE IT for the Royal Shakespeare Company, ROMEO AND JULIET and MOLLY SWEENEY for the Citizens Theatre, and ANDORRA for the Young Vic in the UK and SAINT JOAN and THE ORESTEIA at the Fisher Center, New York in the USA. His own company, AandBC, has toured the UK and beyond with innovative Shakespeare productions of THE TEMPEST, TWELFTH NIGHT, MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING and PERICLES and devised work including THE TALE THAT WAGS THE DOG,  IF I WERE LIFTED UP FROM EARTH and THE MAHABHARATA.

Awards include: Best Director (The Guardian) and Edinburgh Fringe First (The Scotsman) for THE PULL OF NEGATIVE GRAVITY 2004; Best Director for MOLLY SWEENEY (Critics Awards for Theatre in Scotland 2006); Jerwood Young Vic Directors Award 2006; and Best Ensemble for THE WALL (Critics Awards for Theatre in Scotland 2007).

Michael Stewart (Course Director)

We’re looking for lively minds with a desire to make things happen.

We welcome students come from a wide variety of academic disciplines.

If you have a science background, a social science, or arts and humanities background and wish to create innovative, desirable and distinctive new products and startup the value-rich, ethos-driven companies that will take those products to market and thrive in the contemporary world then please apply.

This degree is offered to those who want to create idiosyncratic businesses in any of the nine creative sectors recognised by the Department for Culture Media and Sport: 1. Advertising and marketing; 2. Architecture; 3. Crafts; 4. Design: product, graphic and fashion design; 5. Film, TV, video, radio and photography; 6. IT, software and computer services; 7. Publishing; 8. Museums, galleries and libraries; 9. Music, performing and visual arts.

Beyond these it will also cater to those aiming to work in toys and games; digital design agencies and food or the culinary arts.

The programme is also attractive to people working in the creative industries, who wish to take time out to develop their career in a new direction and to train in the unique combination of specialist skills (critical, creative, collaborative, entrepreneurial, practical and rigorous) that a program based in a university environment can offer.

If you are looking to manage an existing business, we recommend you consider the outstanding MSc Management programme in the UCL School of Management.

The MSc Entrepreneurship offers pathways in Fintech, Health Care, Retail and Consumer, and Technology Entrepreneurship and you may find those closer to your needs.

Entry Requirements

Normally an upper second-class Bachelor's degree in a social science, arts, humanities or science discipline from a UK university or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard.

Applicants with other qualifications will also be considered provided that they are supported by experience in creative or collaborative enterprise.

Applicants with prior experience of enterprise are asked to send a record of activities.

Emphasis is placed on applicants’ ability to begin developing their startup immediately upon joining the degree.

Work experience, though not absolutely required, is highly valued, and applicants with work experience are encouraged to apply.

Applicants may have experience and/or qualifications in fashion, design, video gaming, food, retail, advertising, media, education, publishing, music, or the creative industries. 

Those with no work experience should emphasise the skills they will bring to a startup team in their personal statement.

Students with business or management undergraduate qualifications will need to demonstrate entrepreneurial capabilities in the broad sense of making innovative things happen (events, gatherings, products etc.).

In the application process, applicants with no domain-specific experience will be assessed on their demonstrated desire to contribute to a creative and collaborative entrepreneurial venture.

For more information, email creative&collaborative@ucl.ac.uk

How to apply

For entry in September 2017/18, please apply via the UCLSelect online application portal.

The deadline for submitting applications for the academic year 2017/18 is TBC.

If English is not your first language, you will usually be required to take an IELTS test and reach the ‘good’ level: Details of the English language requirement for studying at UCL

UCL Admissions assess whether overseas degree qualifications fulfil the course requirements and they require a full application to be submitted with all relevant supporting documentation - such as degree transcripts and references - before they can make this assessment.

All enquiries about submitted applications should be directed to the UCL Admissions Department.

UCL Admissions’ preferred method of communicating with applicants is by telephone using +44 (0)20 7679 7742 or 7381 rather than by email.

However they can be emailed to: admissions@ucl.ac.uk.

Interviews

If you are successfully shortlisted for a place on the course you will be interviewed by course director using the online video system WePow - via the internet

Many students will initiate, grow or extend their creative and collaborate enterprises as they work through the course and we expect many of our graduates to develop their startup rather than seek employment.

Those who are working on a startup post-graduation will continue to receive pitching and mentoring opportunities within the UCL ecosystem and be given assistance to make the valuable contacts with the partners, customers, and suppliers that will assist on the journey to success.

However, others will want to secure additional work experience in a relevant sector of the creative economy before starting their ventures and the UCL Career’s Office will provide guidance and assistance with this.

Many of the MSc Entrepreneurship alumni have gone on to build fantastic companies including:

Zain Jaffer, a former part-time MSc Entrepreneurship student, has secured $25m in funding from Google and AOL Ventures for his company Vungle, an app video promotion start-up.

Jan Senderek sold his startup, Loom, to Dropbox; his personal share of the proceeds was over €1m.

Marcin Piatkowski raised £160,000 from crowdfunding site Crowdcube to launch his innovative chainless aluminium electric folding Jivr Bike - as reported in media such as The Daily Telegraph, Tech City News and Bike Biz, and his subsequent Kickstarter was oversubscribed by 80%.

Alex Siljanovski, Manuel Zapata and Laura Davies launched BaseStone, an integrated platform and mobile app that enables engineers and architects to securely issue, review and manage their drawings.

BaseStone is rapidly receiving a huge amount of interest and a number of awards within the construction industry, is working with the world’s leading construction businesses and has secured $700k in investment so far.

Rodrigo Martinez founded WePow and has grown the business hugely, raising over $5m in investment.

Joyce and Raissa Haas founded Double Dutch Drinks, which is growing rapidly, and recently won Richard Branson’s foodpreneur awards.

Karoline Gross founded the adtech company Smartzer and raised a $400k seed round to grow the business just after graduation.

Paul Varga and Tolulope Ogunsina founded Playbrush and conducted a successful Kickstarter campaign for Christmas 2015.

Michael Langguth and Oyvind Henriksen founded Poq Studio and recently raised $500k in crowdfunded equity to fuel its growth.

Other MSc Entrepreneurship graduates have gone on to exciting careers, using the innovation skills they have gained to make a difference for the organisations where they work.

We expect that many of them will start ventures in future years and will come back to UCL for mentoring and networking opportunities when they are ready to do so.

Open City Docs School is delighted to announce five scholarships (in the form of partial fee waivers) for places on any of the three pathways on the MA Creative & Collaborative Enterprise

Two awards of £3,000 are available for the 17/18 academic year for EU and UK nationals only, reducing fees payable to £12,460.

To be considered for one of these awards, UCL Registry must receive your complete application by the end of Wednesday 26th July 2017. You must also notify James Colie (see below) of your desire to be considered for this award by the same time. 

These partial fee waivers will be awarded on the basis of academic merit and financial need, as demonstrated in the notification to James Colie (j.collie@ucl.ac.uk).

These awards are only available to those intending to start in October 2017 and for students who do not already have a scholarship or other award. 

Awardees will be informed of the outcome of their application on 28th July, 2017.

For further information, please contact James Collie at j.collie@ucl.ac.uk