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Abigail Page

Teaching Fellow in Biological Anthropology

Tel: +44 (0)20 7679 8845
Email:
abigail.page.10@ucl.ac.uk
Room:
221

Introduction

I am a Teaching Fellow in Biological Anthropology at University College London. I received by PhD in Evolutionary Anthropology at UCL, while my MSc was in Medical Anthropology in the same department. My undergraduate degree was in Anthropology at the University of Durham. I have been working as part of the Hunter-Gatherer Resilience Project for the last four years, conducting extensive fieldwork in the Philippines.

My research has focused on understanding behaviour of a hunter-gatherer group - the Agta from the Philippines - from an evolutionary perspective. I am, in particular, interested in the evolution of cooperative childcare, the roles of grandmothers and juveniles. I am also focused on understanding the effect of lifestyle change, in terms of increased market integration, settlement and agriculture on the behaviour and health of small-scale populations like the Agta, and how this can help us understand different aspects of behaviour and demography. I am also increasingly interested in evolutionary concepts of risk and how this effects parental decision making in terms of what care to offer (or not) to children. This research has particular relevance to public health frameworks aiming to improve child health and development in a broad range of contexts.

Research interests

  • Life history theory
  • Evolutionary perspectives on health
  • Cooperative breeding
  • Behavioural ecology
  • Hunter-gatherer studies
  • Applied evolutionary anthropology
  • Public health

Academic Background/Education

Research Associate (2016), University College London. Hunter-Gatherer Resilience Project

PhD Biological Anthropology (2012-16), University College London. Thesis: “On trade-offs and communal breeding: The behavioural ecology of Agta foragers"

MSc Medical Anthropology (2010-2011), University College London. Thesis: “The Sum is Greater than its Parts: Obesity and Neoliberalism in a Holistic Discourse.”

BA (Hons) Anthropology (2006-2010) University of Durham. Thesis: “Royal Consanguinity: Inbreeding Coefficients and Health Correlates in the British Royal Line of Succession 1566-1865”

Honours and Awards

  • Beacon Bursary for public engagement. Awarded £2000 to conduct an educational and empowerment workshop centred on health with the Agta (for further information see www.ucl.ac.uk/public-engagement/casestudies/beaconbursaries/december2013/Page).
  • UCL Graduate School Research Fund awarded £2000 for additional fieldwork.
  • Leverhulme Trust PhD Studentship (2012-16) in Hunter-Gatherer Resilience Project.

Publications

Page, A. E., Viguier, S., Dyble, M., Smith, D., Chaudhary, N., Salali, G., Thompson, J., Vinicius, L., Mace, R., and Migliano, A. B. (2016) Reproductive trade-offs in extant hunter-gatherers suggest adaptive mechanism for the Neolithic expansion. PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1524031113.  

Dyble, M., Salali, G., Chaudhary, N., Page, A. E, Thompson, J., Smith, D., Vinicius, L., Mace, R., and Migliano, A. (2015) Sex Equality can explain the unique social structure of hunter-gatherer bands. Science, 348(6236): 796-8.

Chaudhary, N., Salali, G., Thompson, J., Dyble, M., Page, A. E., Smith, D., Mace, R., and Migliano, A. (2015) Polygyny without wealth: Popularity in gift games predicts polygyny in BaYaka Pygmies. Royal Society Open Science, 2: 150054.  

Smith, D., Dyble, M., Thompson, J., Page, A. E., Chaudhary, N., Salali, G., Vinicius, L., Migliano, A. B. and Mace, R., Camp Stability Predicts Patterns of Hunter-Gatherer Cooperation. Royal Society Open Science, 3: 160131.

Chaudhary, N., Salali, G., Thompson, J.  Page, A. E., Smith, D., Dyble, M., Mace, R., and Migliano, A. (2016) Within-Group Competition for Cooperation among BaYaka Hunter-Gatherers. Scientific Reports, 6: 29120. 

Dyble, M., Thompson, J., Page, A.E., Chaudhary, N., Salali, G.D., Vinicius, L., Mace, R., Migliano, A.B., 2016. Networks of food sharing reveal the functional significance of multilevel sociality in two hunter-gatherer groups. Current Biology, 26, 1-5. 

Salali, G.D., Chaudhary, N., Thompson, J., Grace, O.M., Burgt, X.M. van der, Dyble, M., Page, A.E., Smith, D., Lewis, J., Mace, R., Vinicius, L., Migliano, A.B., 2016. Knowledge-sharing networks in hunter-gatherers and the evolution of cumulative culture. Current Biology, 1–6. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2016.07.015. 

Read about our public engagement activities with the Agta in the UCL magazine, Anthropolitan: Hobbes, W., Page, A. and Migliano, A. (2015) Healthy Hunters. Anthropolitan, Summer 2015: 8-9 (www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/news-and-events/newsletter/Anthropolitan-12-low.pdf)