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UCL Anthropology

"The most scientific of the humanities, the most humanistic of the sciences"

UCL Anthropology studies humanity in all its aspects: from our evolution as a species, to our relationship with the material world, and our vast variety of social practices and cultural forms.

Our department is one of only a few broad based anthropology departments in the UK comprised of four sub-sections including Biological Anthropology, Social Anthropology, Material Culture and Medical Anthropology. Our teaching and research reflects the breadth and depth of this cross and interdisciplinary approach.

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Anthropolitan 2.0

We are pleased to announce that our departmental magazine Anthropolitan will be upgraded to Anthropolitan 2.0 in the coming weeks. This not only means that there will be an enhanced and comprehensive online presence of the magazine – on a central dedicated website as well as social media platforms – but also that students and staff in the department will have more opportunities to get involved in promoting UCL Anthropology, raising awareness of anthropology globally. We are currently looking for student volunteers to help facilitate this process. It requires passion, some reporting and story-telling skills, as well as basic digital competence to be an editor. And our editorial team will be rewarded for their work. 

Published: Dec 14, 2016 3:46:39 PM

Anthropology Blogs

Data Waves – finding meaning through music

Thursday, 12 January 2017

Miranda Marcus, UCL Digital Anthropology

Screen Shot 2017-01-12 at 12.02.09

How do we display data in a way that is meaningful? This is the question that has been posed by Dr Robin Carhart-Harris from the Division of Brain Sciences at Imperial College London, the lead researcher on the recent clinical trials into the effects of psilocybin/psychedelics on the brain. Between 2012 and 2016, Dr Carhart-Harris’ team have conducted different studies using psilocybin (the hallucinogenic compound found in magic mushrooms) and LSD aimed at understanding the impact of potent hallucinogenic drugs on the human brain. The results have provided first evidence of the underlying changes in brain function that are associated with the well-documented drug effects and have laid the foundation for future studies to evaluate potential medical treatments for conditions such as depression, end-of-life anxiety and addiction.…

Recap of ‘Mongolian-Made’ Capitalism Workshop

Friday, 09 December 2016

What forms of capitalism are emerging in Mongolia?  How capitalist is Mongolian capitalism?  These are questions that an interdisciplinary group of scholars associated with the Emerging Subjects project at University College London and the National University of Mongolia (NUM) explored at the workshop, ‘Mongolian-Made’ Capitalism, held at the Mongolia-Japan Center in Ulaanbaatar on November 16th.  […]

SAWDUST & THREADS – Part 2

Monday, 21 March 2016

Written by Caroline Wright Sawdust & Threads is a residency and exhibition programme that takes de-accessioned and un-accessioned museum objects as its material. Artist Caroline Wright has undertaken residencies at three different museum collections and selected objects that have been de- or un-accessioned. Caroline has made detailed drawings of each of the objects that are […]

Performing sustainable agriculture in the Peruvian Amazon

Thursday, 10 March 2016

Agathe Faure MRes Social Anthropology University College London I conducted ethnographic fieldwork from May to July 2015 in villages of cacao farmers along the river of Alto Huayabamba, Peruvian Amazonia. Employed by an international company providing environmental services, I was to observe environmental programmes through their local implementation in the area. I quickly realised that … Continue reading Performing sustainable agriculture in the Peruvian Amazon

Media Highlight

The trailer introduces some of the topics you will explore in the free online course created by UCL Anthropology 'Why We Post: the Anthropology of Social Media'.