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UCL Anthropology

"The most scientific of the humanities, the most humanistic of the sciences"

UCL Anthropology studies humanity in all its aspects: from our evolution as a species, to our relationship with the material world, and our vast variety of social practices and cultural forms.

Our department is one of only a few broad based anthropology departments in the UK comprised of four sub-sections including Biological Anthropology, Social Anthropology, Material Culture and Medical Anthropology. Our teaching and research reflects the breadth and depth of this cross and interdisciplinary approach.

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Mary Douglas Awards 2017/18

UCL Anthropology is delighted to announce the Mary Douglas Awards scheme - a series of partial fee waivers linked to our Masters programmes. Eight awards of £3,000 are available for the 17/18 academic year.

Published: Apr 4, 2017 11:27:23 AM

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Anthropology Blogs

Presenting on the ‘Diverse Economies of Megaprojects’ at 13th Annual Mongolia Development Forum

Monday, 24 April 2017

  On Thursday, April 6, we (Rebekah Plueckhahn and Lauren Bonilla) participated in the 13th annual Mongolia Development Forum, held at the headquarters of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) in London.  The forum was co-organized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Mongolian Embassy in the UK, Mongolian Association in the UK, Tsahim […]

Experience Rich Anthropology Revisited

Sunday, 23 April 2017

Hannah Knox, UCL Anthropology 

When I was an undergraduate at the University of Manchester in the late 1990s I recall being introduced by John Gledhill to something called ‘Experience Rich Anthropology’. Established by the anthropology department at the University of Ken, the ERA project was an early attempt to use the possibilities of new media technologies to open up anthropology to new audiences, and to present anthropological knowledge in new ways. The site is still available to view here

It is remarkable then, that in the ensuing 20 years, anthropologists have been rather slow to embrace the possibilities of digital media. Particularly now, when as a matter of course most anthropologists carry around powerful digital research tools in their pockets (smart phones which contain a camera, sound recorder, GPS locator, mapping tools, access to mappable social networks), we still seem remarkably wedded to the form of the research monograph or written journal paper that perhaps includes a few well chosen photographs from our field sites.…

Young curators’ club – week 2: Preserving time

Thursday, 09 March 2017

Written by Shosha Adie and James O’Donoghue, photos by James O’Donoghue The second week of the Young Curator’s programme saw our students learn about the importance and methods of conserving museum collections. Joining Delphine Mercier this week was Susi Pancaldo-Senior Conservator of UCL’s three public museums. With expert knowledge on how to “prolong the life […]

Performing sustainable agriculture in the Peruvian Amazon

Thursday, 10 March 2016

Agathe Faure MRes Social Anthropology University College London I conducted ethnographic fieldwork from May to July 2015 in villages of cacao farmers along the river of Alto Huayabamba, Peruvian Amazonia. Employed by an international company providing environmental services, I was to observe environmental programmes through their local implementation in the area. I quickly realised that … Continue reading Performing sustainable agriculture in the Peruvian Amazon

Media Highlight

Migliano et al. developed a technology to map proximity networks in hunter-gatherers, and show that their social networks exhibit increased efficiency for information exchange due to a few strong ‘friendship’ ties connecting unrelated families. Such friendships are more important than family ties in predicting knowledge sharing. See Migliano et al. 1, 0043 (2017).