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Mathematical & Physical Sciences

Using glucose to fuel drug delivery to the brain

A new drug delivery system that autonomously navigates the body using its own glucose molecules has been developed and tested by a UCL-led team of scientists.

Accurately measuring the dark universe

The theory that dark matter and dark energy make up most of the cosmos has been confirmed by extremely accurate measurements from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration involving UCL scientists.

New clue to solving the mystery of the sun’s hot atmosphere

The elemental composition of the Sun’s hot atmosphere known as the ‘corona’ is strongly linked to the 11-year solar magnetic activity cycle, a team of scientists from UCL, George Mason University and Naval Research Laboratory has revealed for the first time.

Has Cassini found a universal driver for prebiotic chemistry at Titan?

An important type of molecule that helps produce complex organic material has been detected within Titan’s hazy upper atmosphere by a UCL-led team as part of the international Cassini-Huygens mission.

Fear of crime is contagious, even in low crime communities

Fear of crime is perpetuated by the opinion of others, and often doesn’t correlate to the actual likelihood of experiencing crime, according to new UCL research.

UCL community recognised in Queen’s Birthday Honours

A number of people from the UCL community have been recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

UCL’s first satellite ‘UCLSat’ launched

UCLSat, a satellite designed and built by UCL engineers and scientists, has been launched today from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in India as part of an international mission called QB50.

How RNA formed at the origins of life

A single process for how a group of molecules called nucleotides were made on the early Earth, before life began, has been suggested by a UCL-led team of researchers.

Campi Flegrei volcano eruption possibly closer than thought

The Campi Flegrei volcano in southern Italy may be closer to an eruption than previously thought, according to new research by UCL and the Vesuvius Observatory in Naples.

Professor Patrick Wolfe to become UCL's appointed non-executive Director and Trustee at The Alan Turing Institute

Patrick Wolfe, UCL Professor of Statistics and Honorary Professor of Computer Science, has agreed to join the board of the Alan Turing Institute.

Four UCL scientists elected Fellows of the Royal Society

Four UCL scientists have been elected as Fellows of the Royal Society in recognition of their outstanding contribution to science.

Ancient stardust sheds light on the first stars

A huge mass of glowing stardust in a galaxy seen shortly after the Universe’s formation has been detected by a UCL-led team of astronomers, providing new insights into the birth and explosive deaths of the very first stars.

World’s oldest fossils unearthed

Remains of microorganisms at least 3,770 million years old have been discovered by an international team led by UCL scientists, providing direct evidence of one of the oldest life forms on Earth.

First evidence of rocky planet formation in Tatooine system

Evidence of planetary debris surrounding a double sun, ‘Tatooine-like’ system has been found for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers.

UCL part of new £100 million Rosalind Franklin Institute

UCL is involved in the Rosalind Franklin Institute (RFI) – a major new £100 million investment by the government into the development of an innovative multi-disciplinary science and technology research centre.

Immune system defence force captured in action

How the natural defence force within our immune system attacks and destroys harmful invaders such as virus-infected and cancerous cells has been visualised in microscopic detail by scientists from UCL, Birkbeck, University of London, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Monash University, Australia.

Detecting weather on a gas giant exoplanet

Signs of powerful changing winds have been detected on an exoplanet 16 times larger than Earth, according to a team involving UCL scientists. It’s the first time that weather systems have been found on a gas giant outside the solar system.

Understanding how ice crystals form in clouds

How ice forms on the surfaces of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere has been revealed by a team from UCL and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany.

New solution for making 2D nanomaterials

Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials have been made by dissolving layered materials in liquids, according to new UCL-led research. The liquids can be used to apply the 2D nanomaterials over large areas and at low costs, enabling a variety of important future applications.

UCL to host National High Performance Computing Hub for Materials Science

A UCL-led consortium has been awarded £4m to establish a new national High Performance Computing (HPC) facility for the Materials and Molecular Modelling community.

Arctic sea ice loss linked to personal CO2 emissions

Three square metres of Arctic summer sea ice disappears for every tonne of carbon dioxide a person emits, wherever they are on the planet, according to new UCL research.

How often do quantum systems violate the second law of thermodynamics?

The likelihood of seeing quantum systems violating the second law of thermodynamics has been calculated by UCL scientists.

Narrowing the window on sterile neutrinos

A major international collaboration between the MINOS experiment, which involves UCL scientists, and the Daya Bay experiment has today announced results which shed new light on one of the most pressing questions in particle physics – do sterile neutrinos exist?

Study provides strongest evidence oxygen levels were key to early animal evolution

It has long puzzled scientists why, after 3 billion years of nothing more complex than algae, complex animals suddenly started to appear on Earth. Now, a team of researchers has put forward some of the strongest evidence yet to support the hypothesis that high levels of oxygen in the oceans were crucial for the emergence of skeletal animals 550 million years ago.

Celebrating 10 years of Hinode in space

Hinode, a satellite which observes the Sun’s activity in high resolution, today marks ten years of success since its launch. It carries three instruments, one of which – the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) – was built and is managed by a UCL team.